Poem of the Week – Summer Shower by Emily Dickinson

Summer rainSummer Shower by Emily Dickinson

A drop fell on the apple tree,
Another on the roof;
A half a dozen kissed the eaves,
And made the gables laugh.

A few went out to help the brook,
That went to help the sea.
Myself conjectured, Were they pearls,
What necklaces could be!

The dust replaced in hoisted roads,
The birds jocoser sung;
The sunshine threw his hat away,
The orchards spangles hung.

The breezes brought dejected lutes,
And bathed them in the glee;
The East put out a single flag,
And signed the fete away.

Man Booker Longlist Announced Today

h_logo_official_largeThe longlist, or ‘Man Booker Dozen’, for the Man Booker Prize has been announced today, Wednesday 29 July 2015.

This year’s longlist of 13 books was selected by a panel of five judges chaired by Michael Wood, and also comprising Ellah Wakatama Allfrey, John Burnside, Sam Leith and Frances Osborne. The judges considered 156 books for this year’s prize.

This is the second year that the prize, first awarded in 1969, has been open to writers of any nationality, writing originally in English and published in the UK.  Previously, the prize was open only to authors from the UK & Commonwealth, Republic of Ireland and Zimbabwe.

The 2015 longlist of 13 novels, is:

Bill Clegg – Did You Ever Have a Family (Jonathan Cape)            

Anne Enright – The Green Road (Jonathan Cape)

Marlon James – A Brief History of Seven Killings (Oneworld Publications)

Laila Lalami – The Moor’s Account (Periscope, Garnet Publishing)

Tom McCarthy – Satin Island (Jonathan Cape)

Chigozie Obioma – The Fishermen (ONE, Pushkin Press)

Andrew O’Hagan – The Illuminations (Faber & Faber)

Marilynne Robinson – Lila (Virago)            

Anuradha Roy – Sleeping on Jupiter (MacLehose Press, Quercus)

Sunjeev Sahota – The Year of the Runaways (Picador)

Anna Smaill – The Chimes (Sceptre)

Anne Tyler – A Spool of Blue Thread (Chatto & Windus)

Hanya Yanagihara – A Little Life (Picador)

 

The shortlist of six books will be announced on Tuesday 15 September at a press conference at the London offices of Man Group, the prize’s sponsor.

The 2015 winner will then be announced on Tuesday 13 October in London’s Guildhall at a black-tie dinner that brings together the shortlisted authors and well-known figures from the literary world. The ceremony will be broadcast by the BBC and the lucky winner will leave with a cheque for £50,000.

 

 

Poem of the Week – Summer Sun by Robert Louis Stevenson

Summer sunI thought we would continue the summer theme with our poems – and probably will until the end of the summer holidays. I love summer, and there is so much lovely poetry to celebrate it.

Summer Sun
by Robert Louis Stevenson

Great is the sun, and wide he goes
Through empty heaven with repose;
And in the blue and glowing days
More thick than rain he showers his rays.

Though closer still the blinds we pull
To keep the shady parlour cool,
Yet he will find a chink or two
To slip his golden fingers through.

The dusty attic spider-clad
He, through the keyhole, maketh glad;
And through the broken edge of tiles
Into the laddered hay-loft smiles.

Meantime his golden face around
He bares to all the garden ground,
And sheds a warm and glittering look
Among the ivy’s inmost nook.

Above the hills, along the blue,
Round the bright air with footing true,
To please the child, to paint the rose,
The gardener of the World, he goes.

Featured library – Dewsbury Road

I thought I would do a series of blog posts that casts the spotlight on our individual libraries. Really being a librarian, I should feature them in alphabetical order, but as we have some good new stuff coming up at Dewsbury Road, I have had to go against my instinct!

Dewsbury%20Road%20Library%20Exterior_jpgDewsbury Road library is a modern library situated near to New Bewerley School and the Beeston campus of City of Leeds college. It is part of a multi service building where other council services can be accessed. A list of all the services available in the library here.

But that stuff is the everyday stuff – look what else you can get up to!

fountain-pen-447576_640NEW – Creative Writing Group – last Tuesday of the month, 1.00 – 2.30pm

Find inspiration and develop your own writing style amongst a free, fun, eclectic writers group. Whatever your genre or skill level, come along and enjoy discussing anything and everything to do with writing in a supportive and friendly social setting. The next meetings are 28 July, 25 August, 29 September, 27 October and 24 November.

comics clubNEW – Comics Club – starts 23rd July, then moves to every 3rd Thursday of the month, 3.15 – 4.45pm

Join us every third Thursday of the month to make comics, create characters, draw awesome stuff, write awesome stuff and read all kinds of awesome comics! Suitable for families and children aged 6 – 12 years.

 

 

Mug of coffeeCommunity Coffee Morning – every Friday 10.00 – 11.30am

Come along to our relaxed and friendly coffee morning to meet new people, share stories and community information.

Record Breakers logoSummer Reading Challenge – through the summer holidays

Take part in the challenge and read 6 books over the summer and we will reward you with prizes. This years theme is Record Breakers and we are holding all sorts of events in our libraries over the summer, to find out when and where have a look at our Facebook page.

laptop-820274_640IT Learning Sessions

Do you long to use the internet but don’t know where to start? Maybe you have a new tablet that you just can’t get to grips with? Ask at the library counter and they will register you for a learning session with one of our librarians.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Poem of the week – First day of the holidays by Theresa Heine

Lots of children around Leeds will be breaking up for the summer holidays either today or in the next week so I thought it apt to have a poem about the summer holidays.

children in bedFirst day of the holidays

I could
ride my bike,
plait my hair,
go and call on
Paul and Claire,

Clean the budgie,
walk the dog,
practise handstands,
go for a job,

Read a book,
watch TV,
help my Dad
cook the tea.

All these things
and many more
I’ll do tomorrow,
that’s for sure.

but today instead
I’m staying in bed!

Theresa Heine

 

Leeds Libraries – New Fiction this week

Start planning your summer reads. Lots of new fiction arrives in our branches every week. Here are a few of this weeks additions.

Go set a watchmanGo Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

Scout (Jean Louise Finch) has returned to Maycomb from New York to visit her father Atticus. She is forced to grapple with issues both personal and political as she tries to understand both her father’s attitude toward society and her own feelings about the place where she was born and spent her childhood

Glasgow Coma ScaleThe Glasgow Coma Scale by Neil Stewart

Lynne is a young woman who once dreamed of being an artist, but whose promotion to supervisor at an insurance call centre in Glasgow is sucking the soul out of her. When she hands a fiver to a homeless man on the street in town one day, she is shocked to recognise Angus – her former art teacher on whom she once had a crush. What on earth could have reduced him to life on the street? In a gesture of uncharacteristic rashness, she invites him home, and so begins ‘The Glasgow Coma Scale’

Nothing but trouble

Nothing But Trouble by Matt Cain 

Lola Grant is the hottest pop star in Britain and she’s about to go global. But behind the music, her addiction to bad boys is taking her personal life in a dangerous direction. When it comes to men, Lola just can’t stay away from trouble – and her self-control is pushed to the limit when she meets her handsome new drummer Jake Hunter. Looking out for Lola is her best friend and manager Harvey Sparks. But Harvey’s fighting his own demons and can only watch from the sidelines as the star he helped create begins to fall. When Lola seeks comfort in a life of wild partying, she meets good-hearted showbiz reporter Freddy Jones, a man who may just be able to offer her a way out. But as she starts rehearsals for her Trouble tour, Lola finds herself faced with a new threat, one much bigger than anything she’s ever experienced.

The Mixture as BeforeThe Mixture as Before by Rosie Harris

Newly widowed after a forty-year marriage, Margaret Wright is finding it hard to adjust to independence, having been stifled for so long by her overbearing, controlling husband. Is she up to the challenge?

The last embraceThe Last Embrace by Pam Jenoff

August 1940 and 16-year-old refugee Addie escapes Fascist Italy to live with her aunt and uncle in Atlantic City. As WW2 breaks, she finds acceptance and love with Charlie Connally and his family. But war changes everything: secrets and passions abound, and when one brother’s destructive choices lead to the tragic death of another, the Connally family is decimated, and Addie along with them. Now 18, she flees, first to Washington and then to war-torn London where she is swept up with life as a correspondent. But when Charlie, now a paratrooper, re-appears, Addie discovers that the past is impossible to outrun. Now she must make one last desperate attempt to find within herself the answers that will lead the way home.

Three moments of an explosionThree Moments of an Explosion: Stories by China Mieville

In these stories, glistening icebergs float above urban horizons; a burning stag runs wild through the city; the ruins of industry emerge unsteadily from the sea; and the abandoned generations in a decayed space-elevator look not up at the stars but down at the Earth. Ranging from portraits of childhood to chilling ghost stories, from dystopian visions to poignant evocations of uncanny love, with beautiful prose and melancholy wit, this collection poses searching questions of what it is to be human in an unquiet world.

Foxglove SummerFoxglove Summer by Ben Aaronovitch

Ben Aaronovitch takes Peter Grant out of whatever comfort zone he might have found and takes him out of London – to a small village in Herefordshire where the local police are reluctant to admit that there might be a supernatural element to the disappearance of some local children. But while you can take the London copper out of London you can’t take the London out of the copper. Travelling west with Beverley Brook, Peter soon finds himself caught up in a deep mystery and having to tackle local cops and local gods.

The Baklava ClubThe Baklava Club by Jason Goodwin     

In 19th-century Istanbul, a Polish prince has been kidnapped. His assassination has been bungled and his captors have taken him to an unused farmhouse. Little do they realise that their revolutionary cell has been penetrated by their enemies, who use the code name La Piuma (the Feather). Yashim is convinced that the prince is alive. But he has no idea where, or who La Piuma is – and has become dangerously distracted by falling in love. As he draws closer to the prince’s whereabouts and to the true identity of La Piuma, Yashim finds himself in the most treacherous situation of his career: can he rescue the prince along with his romantic dreams?

Follow the links on the book titles to find the books in our catalogue.

Poem of the week – The Olympic Girl by John Betjeman

A poem to celebrate the final weekend of Wimbledon this weekend.

tennis racket and ballsThe Olympic Girl by John Betjeman

The sort of girl I like to see

Smiles down from her great height at me.

 

She stands in strong, athletic pose

And wrinkles her retrouss? nose.

 

Is it distaste that makes her frown,

So furious and freckled, down

On an unhealthy worm like me?

Or am I what she likes to see?

I do not know, though much I care,

xxxxxxxx.

.

.

.

.

would I were

(Forgive me, shade of Rupert Brooke)

An object fit to claim her look.

 

Oh! would I were her racket press’d

With hard excitement to her breast

And swished into the sunlit air

Arm-high above her tousled hair,

And banged against the bounding ball

“Oh! Plung!” my tauten’d strings would call,

“Oh! Plung! my darling, break my strings

For you I will do brilliant things.

And when the match is over, I

Would flop beside you, hear you sigh;

And then with what supreme caress,

You’d tuck me up into my press.

 

Fair tigress of the tennis courts,

So short in sleeve and strong in shorts,

Little, alas, to you I mean,

For I am bald and old and green.