Poem of the week – This Lunar Beauty by W.H. Auden

Auden Selected PoemsThis weeks’ poem is taken from Selected Poems by W.H. Auden.

This lunar beauty
Has no history
Is complete and early;
If beauty later
Bear any feature
It had a lover
And is another.

This like a dream
Keeps another time
And daytime is
The loss of this;
For time is inches
And the heart's changes
Where ghost has haunted
Lost and wanted.

But this was never
A ghost's endeavour
Nor finished this,
Was ghost at ease;
And till it pass
Love shall not near
The sweetness here
Nor sorrow take
His endless look.

Morley Arts Festival: 26th Sep – 31st Oct

Morley_Arts_Logo_MasterLeeds Libraries are delighted to be supporting the Morley Literature Festival again this year. The festival, starting today, is celebrating its 10th anniversary and to celebrate they have a new name and logo. From this year they become the Morley Arts Festival and their logo represents the wealth of literature, music, performance and more that feature as part of the programme this year.

We are hosting several of the events at Morley Library and we would love you to come along. The Edith Cavell Story (Wednesday 7th Oct) is a one woman performance by Julie Ann Cooper to tell the story of the nurse who came to be a matron working in Belgium and finally to her arrest during the First World War.

Morley based poet Susan Darlington will be leading a Poetry Workshop at the library on Saturday 31st October. The workshop will use everyday objects to stimulate a creative response and is suitable for beginners and experienced writers alike.

For further details about these events, and many more please go to the website; www.morleyartsfestival.co.uk or to book tickets, follow this link.

Poem of the week – Song at the Beginning of Autumn by Elizabeth Jennings

collected poems jenningsThis weeks poem is taken from The Collected Poems by Elizabeth Jennings.

Song at the Beginning of Autumn

Now watch this Autumn that arrives
In smells. All looks like Summer still;
Colours are quite unchanged, the air
On green and white serenely thrives.
Heavy the trees with growth and full
The fields. Flowers flourish everywhere.

Proust who collected time within
A child's cake would understand
The ambiguity of this - 
Summer still raging while a thin
Column of smoke stirs from the land
Proving that Autumn gropes for us.

But every season is a kind
Of rich nostalgia. We give names - 
Autumn and Summer, Winter, Spring - 
As though to unfasten from the mind
Our moods and give them outward forms.
We want the certain, solid thing.

But I am carried back against
My will into a childhood where
Autumn is bonfires, marbles, smoke;
I lean against my window fenced
From evocations in the air
When I said Autumn, Autumn broke.

Jackie Collins – Queen of Hollywood Glamour

I was very sad to hear of the death of Jackie Collins yesterday. As a teenager of the eighties Jackie’s books were a revelation to me. They took me, a totally un-glamorous girl growing up in Nottingham just that bit closer to the bright lights of Hollywood. In her novels there were strong ladies that got what they wanted, both in business and in bed. I may not have been in the same league as Lucky Santangelo but I could learn a few things from her!

Here are a selection of her fabulous novels that are available to read from Leeds Libraries, including her latest book, the Santangelos. We also have a number of her novels available to read as ebooks.

The StudThe Stud

At a club like Hobo, there’s no such thing as an impossible fantasy. It’s the nightspot where the beautiful people hang out: people like Tony Blake, our host and guide, people like Fontaine Khaled, jet-setting beauty with a weakness for men, and people like Alexandra, Fontaine’s nubile stepdaughter.

The BitchThe Bitch

She’s a woman who’s never short of a man. They call her the bitch. Fontaine Khaled has an Arab millionaire among her yesterdays and hard-gambling Nico for all her tomorrows. Which only leaves the problem of choosing a man for today. From London to Las Vegas, Hollywood to Athens, Fontaine is the one who calls the shots.

The SantangelosThe Santangelos

A vicious hit, a vengeful enemy, a drug addled Colombian club owner and a sex crazed Italian family – the ever powerful Lucky Santangelo has to deal with them all. Meanwhile Max – her teenage daughter – is becoming the ‘It’ girl in Europe’s modelling world. And her Kennedyesque son, Bobby, is being set up for a murder he didn’t commit. But Lucky can deal. Always strong and unpredictable, with her husband Lennie by her side, she lives up to the family motto – never mess with a Santangelo. Lucky rules – the Santangelos always come out on top.


Moving in the fast lane from Las Vegas to New York, Beverly Hills to a Greek island paradise, ‘Lucky’ takes up where ‘Chances’ left off. Winning is all that matters – and luck has nothing to do with it.

The Love KillersThe Love Killers

Beth, Lara and Rio, three women with a common cause and vengeance in their hearts. They’re out to avenge a murder and they’ll got to any lengths. Their targets are the heirs of the Bassalino crime family.

Hollywood WivesHollywood Wives

They lunch at Ma Maison and the Bistro on salads and hot gossip. Dressed by St. Laurent and Galanos, they dine at the latest restaurants on the rise and fall of one another’s fortunes. They are the Hollywood wives, a privileged breed of women whose ticket to ride is a famous husband

Poem of the week – A Farewell by Alfred Tennyson

Tennyson Major WorksThe poem this week is taken from The Major Works by Alfred Tennyson.

A Farewell

Flow down, cold rivulet, to the sea
Thy tribute wave deliver:
No more by thee my steps shall be
For ever and for ever.

Flow, softly flow, by lawn and lea,
A rivulet then a river:
No where by thee my steps shall be,
For ever and for ever.

But here will sigh thine alder tree,
And here thine aspen shiver;
And here by thee will hum the bee,
For ever and for ever. 

A thousand suns will stream on thee,
A thousand moons will quiver;
But not by thee my steps will be,
For ever and for ever.

Leeds Libraries – New Non-Fiction this week

Here is a selection of the new non-fiction titles that will be arriving this week.

Life below stairsLife below stairs: in the Victorian & Edwardian country house by Sian Evans

From the cook, butler and housekeeper to the footman, lady’s maid and nanny, this is a glimpse behind the scenes of some of Britain’s grandest houses.




Eat yourself beautifulEat yourself beautiful: true beauty, from the inside out by Rosanna Davison

Combining cutting-edge nutritional science, wholesome vegan recipes and practical advice for making the most of a hectic daily routine, ‘Eat Yourself Beautiful’ is a functional and accessible guide to promoting beauty through nutritional wellbeing and the adoption of a balanced lifestyle.

How to knitHow to knit: go from beginner to expert with 20 new projects by Mollie Makes

Knitting may seem complicated, but in fact there are just two stitches you need to learn. Once you have mastered knit and purl, you can knit pretty much anything. The beginner’s section starts with a run-through of the basic tools and equipment you’ll need, as well as a handy guide to choosing yarn. Once you’re ready to start, learn the best way to hold your needles, and tackle the different cast-on methods to work out which works best for you. Once you’ve cast on, you are ready to make those all-important first stitches and choose your first project.

deep southDeep South: four seasons on back roads by Paul Theroux

For the past 50 years, Paul Theroux has travelled to the far corners of the earth – to China, India, Africa, the Pacific Islands, South America, Russia, and elsewhere – and brought them to life in his cool, exacting prose. In ‘Deep South’ he turns his gaze to a region much closer to his home. Travelling through North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas he writes of the stunning landscapes he discovers – the deserts, the mountains, the Mississippi – and above all, the lives of the people he meets.

Queen ElizabethQueen Elizabeth II and the Royal Family

 ‘Queen Elizabeth II and the Royal Family’ is a visual guide to the Queen, from her childhood to today. Telling the story of the House of Windsor, including events such as the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and profiles on key people such as Princess Diana and Prince Harry, right up to the birth of William and Kate’s second child, this is the complete guide to the world’s most famous royal family.

Maggie SmithMaggie Smith: a biography by Michael Coveney

No one does glamour, severity, girlish charm or tight-lipped witticism better than Dame Maggie Smith, one of Britain’s best-loved actors. This biography shines the stage-lights on the life and work of a truly remarkable performer, one whose career spans six decades.

Poem of the Week – To Caroline (1) by Lord Byron

Byron Selected PoemsI love finding poems for the poem of the week on this blog. I will admit that although I enjoy poetry I really don’t read enough of it. However in doing this blog, and perusing the poetry shelves at Central library to find poems to add, I have come across some real gems. I would count this poem amongst them. It comes from the Selected Poems of Lord Byron and it is beautiful.

To Caroline (1)
Think’st thou I saw thy beauteous eyes,
Suffused in tears, implore to stay;
And heard unmoved thy plenteous sighs,
Which said far more than words can say?

Though keen the grief thy tears exprest,
When love and hope lay both o’erthrown,
Yet still, my girl, this bleeding breast
Throbb’d with deep sorrow as thine own.

But when our cheeks with anguish glow’d
When thy sweet lips were join’d to mine,
The tears that from my eyelids flow’d
Were lost in those which fell from thine.

Thou couldst not feel my burning cheek,
Thy gushing tears had quench’d its flame;
And as thy tongue essay’d to speak,
In signs alone it breathed my name.

And yet, my girl, we weep in vain,
In vain our fate in sighs deplore;
Remembrance only can remain, -
But that will make us weep the more.

Again, thou best beloved, adieu!
Ah! If thou canst, o’ercome regret;
Not let thy mind past joys review, -
Our only hope is to forget!