‘Ten books set in’ – Japan

An artist of the floating worldSnow countryThe Scottish  Booktrust have recommended ten novels set in Japan- ‘Japan is a land rich with possibilities for authors keen to explore its unique history and diverse culture…. most enigmatic of countries’.

Yasunari Kawabata — Snow country – A tale of wasted love, and beauty, by Japan’s literary master

Ruth Ozeki – A Tale for the Time Being Enchanting mystery

Iain Banks – Canal Dreams Set in Japan & Panama Canal, story of a world famous Japanese cellist, who refuses to fly, and as a result finds herself involved in the ominous realm of global realpolitik

Night boat: a Zen novelAlan Spence – Night Boat Set in 18th century Japan, a Zen teacher’s quest for truth

David Mitchell – Number9 Dream (Talking Book) Eiji Miyake arrives in a sprawling Japanese metropolis to track down the father he has never met, but the city is a mapless place if you are 19, broke, and the only person you can trust is John Lennon.

The hare with amber eyes: a hidden inheritanceEdmund De Waal – The Hare with Amber Eyes: A Hidden Inheritance – 264 wood and ivory carvings of animals, plants and people, none of them larger than a matchbox; apprentice potter Edmund de Waal was entranced by the collection when he first encountered it in the Tokyo apartment of his great uncle Iggie. When he inherited them, he discovered that they unlocked a story larger than he could have imagined.

Kazuo Ishiguro – An Artist of the Floating World The year is 1948. Japan is rebuilding her cities after the calamtity of WW2. Masuji Ono, the celebrated painter, reflects on a life and One morning like a birdcareer touched by the rise of Japanese militarism

Haruki Murakami – Norwegian Wood We have it as a Talking Book as well. Toru Watanabe is looking back on the love and passions of his life and trying to make sense of it all.

Arthur Golden – Memoirs of a Geisha – Totally loved this one. This seductive and evocative epic tells the extraordinary story of a geisha girl. It reveals the cruelty and ugliness of life behind the rice-paper screens.

Andrew Mitchell – One Morning Like a Bird – Tokyo, 1940. While Japan’s war against China escalates, young Yuji Takano clings to his cocooned life. But conscription looms and the mood turns …

 

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