Impress your friends! Check out our politics book list

The politics bookElection Day is drawing ever closer. If you’re interested in finding out more about political science, the party leaders or how the British political system works, these 10 books offer a great place to start.

Books on how it all works:

The Politics Book by Paul Kelly. Covering everything from the dawn of political thinking to modern day spin this is a brilliant choice for those who really want to dive head first into the subject. Brimming with over 100 ground-breaking ideas and masses of graphs and step by step summaries to help you get to grips with them. You’ll have facts at your fingertips after this read.

British Politics for Dummies by Julian Knight. Packed with bite sized facts and easy to follow information this is the perfect place to start if you are new to politics or simply want to brush up your knowledge in an easy to digest and entertaining way.

An introduction to the party leaders:

The Establishment and how they get away with itCameron: The Rise of the New Conservative by Francis Elliott and James Hanning. Just how did the relatively unknown Cameron rise through the Tory ranks to lead his party to government via coalition with the Liberal Democrats in 2010? This well researched and informative biography sets out to answer that question and give an insight into the man behind the politician.

Ed: The Millibands and the Making of a New Labour by Mehdi Hasan and James Macintyre. Surely no recent party leadership battle has been as personal as that between the Milliband brothers. How Ed came to pursue the same path into politics as his older brother David and ultimately defeat him to become the next Labour Party leader is charted in this enlightening biography.

Nick Clegg: The Biography by Chris Bowers. Riding a tidal wave of popular opinion in 2010 Clegg lead his party into an unexpected coalition government with the Conservative Party. Since then he has come under widespread criticism over U-turns and broken manifesto promises. This biography charts his epic rise to become the second most powerful politician in Britain and equally epic fall from the public’s grace.

Fighting Bull by Nigel Farage. As UKIP take up more and more space on the centre stage of politics it is impossible to overlook this larger than life new fixture of the political right. This book offers a chance to find out what Farage thinks of Farage and his place in British politics today.

British politics today:

Sex Lies and the Ballot Box: 50 Things You Need to Know About British Elections by Philip Cowley and Sex, lies & the ballot box: 50 things you need to know about British electionsRobert Ford. 51 essays on how we vote and why. Examining everything from the effects of a candidate’s sex appeal on their electoral success to why so many of us lie about who we voted for. This is a thought provoking read and timely conversation starter.

Understanding British Party Politics by Stephen Driver. As the idea of a single party leadership, which for so many years dominated British Politics, seems to be drifting into a bygone age and with the country poised for another coalition government this book takes a closer look at recent events which have led to such a significant shift in voting habits and changed the political landscape as we knew it.

In It Together: The Inside Story of the Coalition by Matthew d’Ancona. Have you ever wondered what really goes on behind the scenes of the current coalition government? This book pulls back the curtain to reveal the struggles behind the smiles.

The Establishment and How They Got Away With It by Owen Jones. Just how democratic is our democracy? That’s the question Jones asks as he explores the often shadowy influence of the upper class establishment on all areas of British life from Parliament to press to banks.

Thanks to Gemma Alexander from the Information and Research Library

 

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