Thomas Cromwell – anything like Mark Rylance?

 

Bring up the bodiesSo farewell Wolf Hall (until Hilary Mantel finishes the third part of the Wolf Hall, Bring up the Bodies trilogy ‘The Mirror and the Light’). Was Thomas Cromwell as enigmatic as Mark Rylance’s portrayal or was he much more a real baddie? Thomas Cromwell: Henry VIII's henchman

Here’s some biographies of the main protagonists ….

Thomas Cromwell: Henry VIII’s henchman by Patrick Coby. Thomas Cromwell served as chief minister of Henry VIII from 1531 to 1540. Many of the momentous events of the 1530s are attributed to his agency. This biography shows the true face of a Machiavellian Tudor statesman of no equal

Thomas Cromwell: the untold story of Henry VIII’s most faithful servant by Tracy Bowman. Reviled as a Machiavellian schemer who stopped at nothing in his quest for power, Thomas Cromwell was also a loving husband, father and guardian, a witty and generous host, and a loyal and devoted servant. With new insights into Cromwell’s character, his family life and his close relationships with both Cardinal Wolsey and Henry VIII, the book, examines the life, loves and legacy of the man who changed the shape of England forever.

Henry VIII: the life and rule of England's NeroHenry VIII: the life and rule of England’s Nero by John Matusiak. 500 years after he ascended the throne, the reputation of England’s best known king is, it seems, being rehabilitated and subtly sanitised. Here, Tudor historian John Matusiak paints an absorbingly intimate portrait of a man wholly unfit for power: his personality, his beliefs, his relationships, his follies, his hollow triumphs, his bitter disappointments.

The divorce of Henry VIII: the untold story by Catherine Fletcher. The backdrop is war-torn Renaissance Italy, combining a gripping family saga with the highly charged political battle of the Tudors & the Vatican, it reveals the extraordinary story of history’s most infamous divorce

Our man in Rome: Henry VIII and his Italian ambassador by Catherine Fletcher. Set against the backdrop of war-torn Renaissance Italy, ‘Our Man in Rome’ weaves together tales from the grubby underbelly of Tudor politics.

The creation of Anne Boleyn: in seach of the Tudors’ most notorious queen by Susan Bordo Part biography, The creation of Anne Boleyn: in search of the Tudors' most notorious queenpart cultural history, ‘The Creation of Anne Boleyn’ is a fascinating reconstruction of Anne’s life and an illuminating look at her afterlife in the popular imagination

The Boleyns: the rise & fall of a Tudor family by D. M. Loades. The fall of Anne Boleyn and her brother George is the classic drama of the Tudor era. The Boleyns had long been an influential English family. This title tells the tale of family rivalry and intrigue set against Henry’s VIII’s court

 Mary Boleyn: ‘the great and infamous whore’ by Alison Weir Mary Boleyn: 'the great and infamous whore'Mary Boleyn is remembered by posterity as a ‘great and infamous whore’. She was the mistress of two kings, Francois I of France and Henry VIII of England and sister to Anne Boleyn, Henry VIII’s second wife. She may secretly have borne Henry a child and it was because of his adultery with Mary that his marriage to Anne was annulled.

 Catherine of Aragon: Henry’s Spanish queen: a biography by Giles Tremlett Reformation, revolution and Tudor history would all have been vastly different without Catherine of Aragon. This biography is the first in more than four decades to be dedicated entirely to the tenacious woman. It draws on fresh material from Spain to trace the dramatic events of her life through Catherine of Aragon’s own eyes

 

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4 thoughts on “Thomas Cromwell – anything like Mark Rylance?

  1. Antonia Fraser wrote a really accessible biography of all six of Henry’s wives, that also gives a pretty good over-view of the Henrician period as a whole. Packed with information, but not dry in the way that a lot of serious academic texts can be. A really engaging work of popular history, well worth a read for anyone interested in the period.

  2. For a really good, well-researched historical novel, Margaret Skea’s ‘Turn of the Tide’ is well worth a look. Set in 16thC Scotland, it follows the story of Munro, caught between duty and integrity. Beautifully written.

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