Drugs and Rock N’ Roll – New Non Fiction this week

Every week we get new books delivered to our libraries across the city. These are a few of the latest non fiction books that have arrived in the last week.

Theres somethingThere’s something I’ve been dying to tell you by Lynda Bellingham

In 2013, actress, television personality and Sunday Times bestselling author, Lynda Bellingham was diagnosed with cancer. Until now, Lynda hasn’t spoken publicly about her illness – she has felt strongly that everyone’s experience of cancer is so different, and she wanted to keep what she has been going through personal to her while she came to terms with her life now. But in this memoir, Lynda talks with beautiful poignancy about her life since her diagnosis, her family and how together they came to terms with a future they hadn’t planned. This is a brave and brutally honest memoir and yet even when talking about these deeply personal experiences, Lynda manages to spread her infectious warmth and humour bringing light to a very dark time.

Getcha rocks offGetcha rocks off: sex & excess, bust-ups & binges, life & death on the rock ‘n’ roll road by Mick Wall

Hanging out with rock stars, trying to steal their chicks, or throwing up over their guitars after launching into the hospitality a little too enthusiastically, Mick Wall spent much of the 1980s sprawled in limos and five-star hotels with the biggest rock bands in the world, including Led Zeppelin, Guns N’ Roses, Metallica, Black Sabbath, Motley Crue, Thin Lizzy, Deep Purple, Alice Cooper, Van Halen, Motorhead and more. ‘Getcha Rocks Off’ is a rock apocalypse ‘Cider With Roadies’, and a more frank and disturbing ‘Apathy for the Devil’.

soundtrack to my lifeThe soundtrack to my life by Dermot O’Leary      

This is the story of Dermot’s life so far, from growing up in semi-rural Colchester with his Irish born parents, to landing one of the biggest jobs in TV. Throughout this journey, music has been a constant companion: a best friend, a confidant, a really annoying sibling, and at times a tormentor.

rival queensThe rival queens: Catherine de’ Medici, her daughter Marguerite de Valois, and the betrayal that ignited a kingdom by Nancy Bazelon Goldstone

Set in Renaissance France at the magnificent court of the Valois kings, this book tells the history of two remarkable women, a mother and daughter driven into opposition by a terrible betrayal that threatened to destroy the realm. Catherine de’ Medici, the infamous queen mother of France, was a consummate pragmatist and powerbroker who dominated the throne for 30 years. Her youngest daughter Marguerite, the glamorous ‘Queen Margot’, was a passionate free spirit, the only adversary whom her mother could neither intimidate nor control. When Catherine forces the Catholic Marguerite to marry her Protestant cousin Henry of Navarre against her will, and then uses her opulent Parisian wedding as a means of luring his Huguenot followers to their deaths, she creates not only savage conflict within France but also a potent rival within her own family.

seymours of wolf hallThe Seymours of Wolf Hall: a Tudor family story by D. M. Loades

Although the Seymours arrived with the Normans, it is with Jane, Henry VIII’s third queen, and her brothers – Edward, Duke of Somerset, and Thomas, Lord Seymour of Sudeley – that they became prominent. Jane bore Henry his longed-for son, Edward VI, and both her brothers achieved prominence through her. Her brother Edward was central to Henry’s activities in Scotland and become Lord Protector for the young king, his nephew, a hugely powerful position. This title tells the epic rise and fall of the family at the heart of the Tudor court and of Henry VIII’s own heart; he described Jane as ‘my first true wife’ and left express orders to be buried next to her tomb at Windsor Castle. The family seat of Wolfhall or ‘Wolf Hall’ in Wiltshire is long gone, but it lives on as an icon of the Tudor age.

good morning mr mandelaGood morning, Mr Mandela by Zelda La Grange

Zelda la Grange grew up in South Africa as a white Afrikaner who supported the rules of segregation. Yet just a few years after the end of Apartheid she would become a most trusted assistant to Nelson Mandela, growing to respect and cherish the man she had been taught was the enemy. ‘Good Morning, Mr Mandela’ tells the extraordinary story of how a young woman had her life, beliefs, prejudices and everything she once believed in utterly transformed by the greatest man of her time.

 

last act of loveThe last act of love: the story of my brother and his sister by Cathy Rentzenbrink

In the summer of 1990 – two weeks before his GCSE results, which turned out to be the best in his school – Cathy Rentzenbrink’s brother Matty was knocked down by a car on the way home from a night out, suffering serious head injuries. He was left in a permanent vegetative state. Over the following years, Cathy and her parents took care of Matty – they built an extension onto the village pub where they lived and worked; they talked to him, fed him, bathed him, loved him. But there came a point at which it seemed the best thing they could do for Matty – and for themselves – was let him go. With unflinching honesty and raw emotional power, Cathy describes the unimaginable pain of losing her brother and the decision that changed her family’s lives forever.

the infiltratorThe infiltrator: undercover in the world of drug barons and dirty banks by Robert Mazur

Robert Mazur tells the story of Operation C-Chase, one of the most successful undercover operations in the history of US law enforcement, and how he helped bring down the unscrupulous bankers who manipulated complex international finance systems to serve drug lords, corrupt politicians, tax cheats and terrorists. It is a shocking chronicle of the rise and fall of perhaps the biggest and most intricate money-laundering operation of all time, and a stunning and vivid portrait of an undercover life and the sacrifice it requires

Advertisements

Make a Comment, Review a Book

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s