Man Booker Award 2017 – Shortlist announced

The Man Booker Prize is the most well known literary award in the English speaking world, and has brought recognition and reward to outstanding fiction for over four decades. Each year, the prize is awarded to what is, in the opinion of the judges, the best novel of the year written in English and published in the UK. It is a prize that can transform the winner’s career.

The prize winner receives £50,000 as well as the £2,500 awarded to each of the six shortlisted authors. Both the winner and the shortlisted authors are guaranteed a worldwide readership plus a dramatic increase in book sales.

The shortlisted books, and their lucky authors who each receive that £2,500 have been announced today. The overall winner will be announced on the 17th October 2017.

Which one will be your winner and will you agree with the judges?

Booker 43214 3 2 1 by Paul Auster

On March 3, 1947, in the maternity ward of Beth Israel Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, Archibald Isaac Ferguson, the one and only child of Rose and Stanley Ferguson, is born. From that single beginning, Ferguson’s life will take four simultaneous and independent fictional paths.

Four Fergusons made of the same genetic material, four boys who are the same boy, will go on to lead four parallel and entirely different lives. Family fortunes diverge. Loves and friendships and intellectual passions contrast. Chapter by chapter, the rotating narratives evolve into an elaborate dance of inner worlds enfolded within the outer forces of history as, one by one, the intimate plots of the four Fergusons’ stories rush on across the tumultuous and fractured terrain of mid-20th century America. A boy grows up – again and again and again.

Booker History of WolvesHistory of Wolves by Emily Fridlund

Linda, age 14, lives on a dying commune on the edge of a lake in the Midwest of America. She and her parents are the last remaining inhabitants, the others having long since left amid bitter acrimony. She has grown up isolated both by geography and her understanding of the world, and is an outsider at school, regarded as a freak.

One day she notices the arrival of a young family in a cabin on the opposite side of the lake. She starts to befriend them, first their four-year-old son Paul, and then his young mother Patra, who is also lonely and isolated. For the first time she feels a sense of belonging that has been missing from her life.

Leo, the father, is a university professor and an enigmatic figure, perpetually absent. When he returns home, Linda is shunned by the family unit. Desperate to be accepted again, she struggles to resume her place in their home and fails to see the terrible warning signals, which have such devastating consequences.

Booker Exit WestExit West by Mohsin Hamid

In a city swollen by refugees but still mostly at peace, or at least not yet openly at war, Saeed and Nadia lock eyes across their classroom. After a while, they talk, he makes her smile and they start to fall in love. They try not to notice the sound of bombs getting closer every night, the radio announcing new laws, the curfews and the public executions.

Eventually the problem is too big to ignore: it’s not safe for Nadia to live alone and she must move in with Saeed, even though they are not married, and that too is a problem. Meanwhile, rumours are spreading of strange black doors in secret places across the city, doors that lead to London or San Francisco, Greece or Dubai. One day soon the time will come for Nadia and Saeed to seek out one such door, joining the great outpouring of those fleeing a collapsing city, hoping against hope, looking for their place in the world.

Booker ElmetElmet by Fiona Mozley

Daniel is heading north. He is looking for someone. The simplicity of his early life with Daddy and Cathy has turned sour and fearful. They lived apart in the house that Daddy built for them with his bare hands. They foraged and hunted. When they were younger, Daniel and Cathy had gone to school. But they were not like the other children then, and they were even less like them now. Sometimes Daddy disappeared, and would return with a rage in his eyes. But when he was at home he was at peace. He told them that the little copse in Elmet was theirs alone. But that wasn’t true. Local men, greedy and watchful, began to circle like vultures. All the while, the terrible violence in Daddy grew.

Elmet is a lyrical commentary on contemporary English society and one family’s precarious place in it, as well as an exploration of how deep the bond between father and child can go.

Booker LincolnLincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

On 22 February 1862, two days after his death, Willie Lincoln is laid to rest in a marble crypt in a Georgetown cemetery. That very night, shattered by grief, his father Abraham arrives at the cemetery, alone, under cover of darkness.

Over the course of that evening, Abraham Lincoln paces the graveyard unsettled by the death of his beloved boy, and by the grim shadow of a war that feels as though it is without end. Meanwhile Willie is trapped in a state of limbo between the dead and the living – drawn to his father with whom he can no longer communicate, existing in a ghostly world populated by the recently passed and the long dead.

Unfolding in the graveyard over a single night, narrated by a dazzling chorus of voices, Lincoln in the Bardo is a thrilling exploration of death, grief and the deeper meaning and possibilities of life.

Booker AutumnAutumn by Ali Smith

How about Autumn 2016? Daniel is a century old. Elisabeth, born in 1984, has her eye on the future. The United Kingdom is in pieces, divided by a historic once-in-a-generation summer.

Autumn is a meditation on a world growing ever more bordered and exclusive, on what richness and worth are, on what harvest means. This first in a seasonal quartet casts an eye over our own time. Who are we? What are we made of? Shakespearian jeu d’esprit, Keatsian melancholy, the sheer bright energy of 1960s Pop art: the centuries cast their eyes over our own history-making.

From the imagination of Ali Smith comes a shape-shifting series, wide-ranging in timescale and light-footed through histories, and a story about ageing and time and love and stories themselves.

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Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction longlist announced

The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction chose to announce the longlisted books on International Women’s Day earlier this week. The list is sixteen brilliant books chosen by the 2017 judging panel. This year the panel members are Tessa Ross, Chair of Judges, comedian Sara Pascoe, novelist Aminatta Forna, broadcaster Katie Derham and journalist Sam Baker.

The judges now have the unenviable task of whittling these sixteen titles down to just six shortlisted titles before finally choosing the winner which will be revealed at an awards ceremony hosted in the Clore Ballroom at the Royal Festival Hall on 7 June 2017.

And of course you can borrow them all from Leeds Libraries so you can see which ones you think deserve to be on the shortlist, and ultimately win the £30,000 prize money.

Baileys Stay with meStay With Me by Ayobami Adebayo

Yejide is hoping for a miracle, for a child. It is all her husband wants, all her mother-in-law wants, and she has tried everything – arduous pilgrimages, medical consultations, dances with prophets, appeals to God. But when her in-laws insist upon a new wife, it is too much for Yejide to bear. It will lead to jealousy, betrayal and despair.

Unravelling against the social and political turbulence of 80s Nigeria, Stay With Me sings with the voices, colours, joys and fears of its surroundings. Ayobami Adebayo weaves a devastating story of the fragility of married love, the undoing of family, the wretchedness of grief, and the all-consuming bonds of motherhood. It is a tale about our desperate attempts to save ourselves and those we love from heartbreak.

Baileys The PowerThe Power by Naomi Alderman

In ‘The Power’, the world is a recognisable place: there’s a rich Nigerian kid who larks around the family pool; a foster girl whose religious parents hide their true nature; a local American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But something vital has changed, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power – they can cause agonising pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world changes utterly.

Baileys Hag-seedHag-Seed byMargaret Atwood

Felix is at the top of his game as Artistic Director of the Makeshiweg Theatre Festival. His productions have amazed and confounded. Now he’s staging a Tempest like no other: not only will it boost his reputation, it will heal emotional wounds. Or that was the plan. Instead, after an act of unforeseen treachery, Felix is living in exile in a backwoods hovel, haunted by memories of his beloved lost daughter, Miranda. And also brewing revenge. After 12 years, revenge finally arrives in the shape of a theatre course at a nearby prison. Here, Felix and his inmate actors will put on his Tempest and snare the traitors who destroyed him. It’s magic! But will it remake Felix as his enemies fall?

Baileys Little DeathsLittle Deaths by Emma Flint

It’s the summer of 1965, and the streets of Queens, New York shimmer in a heatwave. One July morning, Ruth Malone wakes to find a bedroom window wide open and her two young children missing. After a desperate search, the police make a horrifying discovery. Noting Ruth’s perfectly made-up face and provocative clothing, the empty liquor bottles and love letters that litter her apartment, the detectives leap to convenient conclusions, fuelled by neighbourhood gossip and speculation. Sent to cover the case on his first major assignment, tabloid reporter Pete Wonicke at first can’t help but do the same. But the longer he spends watching Ruth, the more he learns about the darker workings of the police and the press. Soon, Pete begins to doubt everything he thought he knew. Ruth Malone is enthralling, challenging and secretive – is she really capable of murder?

Baileys The MareThe Mare by Mary Gaitskill

Velveteen Vargas is eleven years old, a Fresh Air Fund kid from Brooklyn. Her host family is a couple in upstate New York: Ginger, a failed artist on the fringe of Alcoholics Anonymous, and Paul, an academic who wonders what it will mean to “make a difference” in such a contrived situation. The Mare illuminates the couple’s changing relationship with Velvet over the course of several years, as well as Velvet’s powerful encounter with the horses at the stable down the road, as Gaitskill weaves together Velvet’s vital inner-city community and the privileged country world of Ginger and Paul.

Baileys Teh Dark CircleThe Dark Circle by Linda Grant

The Second World War is over, a new decade is beginning but for an East End teenage brother and sister living on the edge of the law, life has been suspended. Sent away to a tuberculosis sanatorium in Kent to learn the way of the patient, they find themselves in the company of army and air force officers, a car salesman, a young university graduate, a mysterious German woman, a member of the aristocracy and an American merchant seaman. They discover that a cure is tantalisingly just out of reach and only by inciting wholesale rebellion can freedom be snatched.

Baileys Lesser BohemiansThe Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride

One night in London an 18 year old girl, recently arrived from Ireland to study drama, meets an older actor and a tumultuous relationship ensues. Set across the bedsits and squats of mid-nineties north London, ‘The Lesser Bohemians’ is a story about love and innocence, joy and discovery, the grip of the past and the struggle to be new again.

 

Baileys midwinterMidwinter by Fiona Melrose

Father and Son, Landyn and Vale Midwinter, are men of the land. Suffolk farmers. Times are hard and they struggle to sustain their property, their livelihood and their heritage in the face of competition from big business. But an even bigger, more brutal fight is brewing: a fight between each other, about the horrible death of Cecelia, beloved wife and mother, in Zambia ten years earlier. A past they have both refused to confront until now. Over the course of a particularly mauling Suffolk winter, Landyn and Vale grapple with their memories and their pain, raking over what remains of their fragile family unit, constantly at odds and under threat of falling apart forever. While Vale makes increasingly desperate decisions, Landyn retreats, finding solace in the land, his animals – and a fox who haunts the farm and seems to bring with her both comfort and protection.

Baileys Sport of KingsThe Sport of Kings by C.E. Morgan

Hellsmouth, a wilful thoroughbred filly, has the legacy of a family riding on her.

The Forges: one of the oldest and proudest families in Kentucky; descended from the first settlers to brave the Wilderness Road; as mythic as the history of the South itself – and now, first-time horse breeders.

Through an act of naked ambition, Henry Forge is attempting to blaze this new path on the family’s crop farm. His daughter, Henrietta, becomes his partner in the endeavour but has desires of her own. When Allmon Shaughnessy, an African American man fresh from prison, comes to work in the stables, the ugliness of the farm’s history rears its head. Together through sheer will, the three stubbornly try to create a new future – one that isn’t determined by Kentucky’s bloody past – while they mould Hellsmouth into a champion.

Baileys Woman next doorThe Woman Next Door by Yewande Omotoso

Hortensia James and Marion Agostino are neighbours. One is black, one white. Both are successful with impressive careers. Both have recently been widowed. And both are sworn enemies, sharing a hedge and hostility and pruning both with a vim that belies the fact they are over 80. But one day an unforeseen event forces the women together. And gradually the bickering and sniping softens into lively debate, and from there into memories shared. But could these sparks of connection ever transform into friendship? Or is it too late for these two to change?

Baileys lonely Hearts HotelThe Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill

Two babies are abandoned in a Montreal orphanage in the winter of 1910. Before long, their talents emerge: Pierrot is a piano prodigy; Rose lights up even the dreariest room with her dancing and comedy. As they travel around the city performing clown routines, the children fall in love with each other and dream up a plan for the most extraordinary and seductive circus show the world has ever seen.

Separated as teenagers, sent off to work as servants during the Great Depression, both descend into the city’s underworld, dabbling in sex, drugs and theft in order to survive. But when Rose and Pierrot finally reunite beneath the snowflakes after years of searching and desperate poverty the possibilities of their childhood dreams are renewed, and they’ll go to extreme lengths to make them come true. Soon, Rose, Pierrot and their troupe of clowns and chorus girls have hit New York, commanding the stage as well as the alleys, and neither the theater nor the underworld will ever look the same.

Baileys Essex SerpentThe Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry

Set in Victorian London and an Essex village in the 1890’s, and enlivened by the debates on scientific and medical discovery which defined the era, ‘The Essex Serpent’ has at its heart the story of two extraordinary people who fall for each other, but not in the usual way. They are Cora Seaborne and Will Ransome. Cora is a well-to-do London widow who moves to the Essex parish of Aldwinter, and Will is the local vicar. They meet as their village is engulfed by rumours that the mythical Essex Serpent, once said to roam the marshes claiming human lives, has returned.

Baileys BarkskinsBarkskins by Annie Proulx

In the late 17th century two illiterate woodsmen, René Sel and Charles Duquet, make their way from Northern France to New France to seek a living. Bound to a feudal lord, a ‘seigneur’, for three years in exchange for land, they suffer extraordinary hardship, always in awe of the forest they are charged with clearing, sometimes brimming with dreams of its commercial potential. Rene marries an Indian healer, and they have children, mixing the blood of two cultures. Duquet travels the globe and back, starting a logging company that will prosper for generations. Proulx tells the stories of the children, grandchildren, and descendants of these two lineages, the Sels and the Duquets, as well as the descendants of their allies and foes, as they travel back to Europe, to China, to New England, always in quest of a livelihood or a fortune, or fleeing stunningly brutal conditions.

Baileys First LoveFirst Love by Gwendoline Riley

Neve is a writer in her mid-30s married to an older man, Edwyn. For now they are in a place of relative peace, but their past battles have left scars. As Neve recalls the decisions that led her to this marriage, she tells of other loves and other debts, from her bullying father and her self-involved mother to a musician who played her and a series of lonely flights from place to place. Drawing the reader into the battleground of her relationship, Neve spins a story of helplessness and hostility, an ongoing conflict in which both husband and wife have played a part. But is this, nonetheless, also a story of love?

Baileys Do not sayDo Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

At the center of this epic story are two young women, Marie and Ai-Ming. Through their relationship Marie strives to piece together the tale of her fractured family in present-day Vancouver, seeking answers in the fragile layers of their collective story. Her quest will unveil how Kai, her enigmatic father, a talented pianist, and Ai-Ming’s father, the shy and brilliant composer, Sparrow, along with the violin prodigy Zhuli were forced to reimagine their artistic and private selves during China’s political campaigns and how their fates reverberate through the years with lasting consequences.

With maturity and sophistication, humor and beauty, Thien has crafted a novel that is at once intimate and grandly political, rooted in the details of life inside China yet transcendent in its universality.

Baileys Gustav SonataThe Gustav Sonata by Rose Tremain

It is the tutor who tells the young Gustav that he must try to be more like a coconut – that he needs a hard shell to protect the softness inside. This is what his native Switzerland has perfected – a shell to protect its neutrality, to keep its people safe. But his beloved friend, Anton, doesn’t want to be safe – a gifted pianist, he longs to make his mark on the world outside. On holiday one summer in Davos, the boys stumble across a remote building. Long ago, it was a TB sanitorium; now it is wrecked and derelict. Here, they play a game of life and death, deciding which of their imaginary patients must burn. It becomes their secret. ‘The Gustav Sonata’ begins in the 1930s, under the shadow of the Second World War, and follows the boys into maturity, and middle age, where their friendship is tested as never before.

Children’s Writing Competition: Leeds Big Bookend

logo_finalThe Big Bookend are currently running a writing competition aimed at young writers in the city. They would like you to write a short story or poem about the First World War. If you are between 7 and 16 and you do then you could win a prize. The competition is part of the ‘First World War and Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty: Leeds Pals, POWs and the Home Front’ project and in association with the Leeds Big Bookend.

You could be a budding writer with an interest in the First World War or someone who works with young people who are studying the First World War.  The competition aims to encourage young people from Yorkshire to reflect on and write about the First World War – be it war at sea, theatres of war around the world or the war on the Home Front here in Yorkshire. Stories that reflect on the impact of the First World War on local people and places are encouraged. Entries could be short stories, poem or verse, as long as they meet the terms of entry described below. The winning entries will be published on Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s and the Leeds Big Bookend’s websites and used in other displays and presentations as part of the First World War Centenary project.

For further details about the project and about the Big Bookend Festival, have a look at their website.

The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize longlist

While the gods were sleepingWe like some translated fiction, so it’s great to have these titles longlisted for The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize

It’s warded to honour contemporary fiction in translation and worth £10,000 in prize money has published its longlist – chosen from 111 titles from 28 languages

The prize is divided equally between author and translator, recognising the importance of the translator in his/her ability to bridge the gap between languages and cultures.

Haruki Murakami –  Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel. The book follows the title character, who as an adult goes on a journey to find out why his childhood friends stopped speaking to him suddenly.

Karl Ove KnausgaardBoyhood Island translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett. Boyhood Island is the third book in Knausgaard’s My Struggle series, and sees the author revisiting his childhood.

The dead lakeThen five German titles –

Look Who’s Back by Timur Vermes, translator Jamie Bulloch, about Hitler waking up in 2011.

F by Daniel Kehlmann about two brothers with nothing in common, translatorCarol Brown.

The End of Days by Jenny Erpenbeck, translator Susan Bernofsky, follows the possible lives of one woman in the 20th century.

The Giraffe’s Neck by Judith Schalansky translator Shaun Whiteside, about a biology teacher who believes in the survival of the fittest who has to learn to adapt.

Tiger Milk by Stefanie de Velasco translatory Tim Mohr, about two best friends growing up.

The Investigation by Jung-Myung Lee,  Korean translated by Chi-Young Kim, about a murder at a Korean Bloodlinesprison in 1944. Lee is only the second Korean writer to feature on the prize’s longlist in its 25-year history.

The Last Lover by Can Xue, Chinese, translator Annelise Finegan Wasmoen, tale of a series of husbands, wives & lovers.

Two Spanish novels – In the Beginning Was the Sea by Tomás González translator Frank Wynne, about a couple who abandon city life for a new life on a remote tropical coast. Wynne won in 2005 with his translation of Windows on the World by Frédéric Beigbeder

By Night the Mountain Burns by Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel translator Jethro Soutar, recounts the narrator’s childhood on a remote island off the West African coast.

The Ravens by Tomas Bannerhed translated from the Swedish by Sarah Death, a story of a father & son in ’70s Sweden.

Bloodlines by Marcello Fois, Italian, translated by Silvester Mazzarella, is about the lives and loves of the Chironi family.

The Dead Lake by Hamid Ismailov. Andrew Bromfield translated from Russian; it’s about the Cold War’s environmental legacy

While the Gods Were Sleeping by Erwin Mortier Dutch, translator Paul Vincent. An old woman looks back at her life.

The shortlist will be announced on Thursday 9th April. The winner will be announced on Wednesday 27th May.

 

 

 

Writing competitions closing in April

Kishboo magazine short story competition

Ongoing short story competition – stories must be no more than 2,000 words

Entry fee: £3

First prize -£50 ,  runner- up f £25

Closing date:  20 April

 

First Crediton Short Story Competition

Stories on the theme GENERATIONS

  • 16/18* or over –  a maximum of 3,000 words. Prize £50 & a night’s stay at the Lamb Inn, Sandford. Runner-up: £20.
  • 12 to 16/18* –  a maximum of 1,000. First prize – £25 book token, second prize – £10 book token.
  • 5 to 7 or 8 to 11 – a maximum of 500. first prize for each age group – £20 book token, second prize – £10 book token

*for the purpose of this competition adults are 18 years & over and those aged 16-18 not in full-time education. Top stories in each group published on www.creditoncommunitybookshop.co.uk

 Closing date: 24 April

 

The Bath Short Story Competition

The competition is international, up to 2200 words.

First prize £1000, 2nd prize £200, 3rd prize £100. Local prize of £50 in book tokens sponsored by Mr B’s Emporium of Books, Bath and The Acorn Award, a £50 prize for an unpublished writer

Entry fee: £8

Closing date: 27th April

 

Bristol Short Story Prize

No particular theme, up to 4,000 words.

First prize is £1,000 plus a £150 Waterstones gift card, 2nd prize is £700 plus a £100 Waterstones gift card and 3rd prize is £400 plus a £100 Waterstones gift card.

Entry fee: £8 for each story entered.

Closing date: April 30

 

Over the Red Line

Up to 4,500 words on the theme of nature

Prize: £50

Entry fee: looks to be free

Closing date:  30 April

 

Senior Travel Expert City, Town or Village Writing Competition

Up to 750 words by 16 years and over on any city, town or village, factual or fiction

Entry: free

Prize of £100 to the author of the best entry.

Closing date: 30 April

 

Writing Competitions Reinvented

Poetry and short story competition

Short story: any subject; length 750 to 3,000 words; previously unpublished work. Entry fee: £12 . One entry  per person

Poetry: any subject; poetry or prose poetry; maximum 42 lines; previously unpublished work; Entry fee: £7 per poem.

First Prize £2,000 (for each competition)

Closing date: 30 April 2015

 

The  Exeter Story Prize

Stories of up to 10,000 words.

First prize – £500 + trophy, second – £150, third – £100. In addition, CreativeWritingMatters has announced: The Trisha Ashley Award for the best humorous story – £200 + trophy.

Entry fee: £8

Closing date 30 April 2015

 

 

 

Great Reads @BaileysPrize Fiction longlist is announced

Longlist for Bailey's Women's PrizeThe Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction longlist features some great reads. With five debut novelists and eight previously shortlisted authors, it showcases both rising stars and well-established writers.

Chair of the judging panel Shami Chakrabarti said: “The Prize’s 20th year is a particularly strong one for women’s fiction.  All judges fought hard for their favourites and the result is a 2015 list of 20 to be proud of – with its mix of genres and styles, first-timers and well-known names from around the world. There is a very strong showing of UK writers and we are all incredibly excited about the final stages of the search for the winner.”

The 20 books will be cut down to a shortlist of six and an overall winner will be chosen by 3rd June.

LonglistBAILEYS Women's Prize for Fiction

Click through on the links to find more information about the books.

Rachel Cusk-  Outline

Lissa Evans – Crooked Heart 5 star rated by Leeds readers

Patricia Ferguson – Aren’t We Sisters?

Xiaolu Guo – I Am China

Samantha Harvey –  Dear Thief

Emma Healey – Elizabeth is Missing

Emily St. John Mandel – Station Eleven

Grace McCleen – The Offering

Sandra Newman – The Country of Ice Cream Star

Heather O’Neill – The Girl Who Was Saturday Night

Laline Paull – The Bees

Marie Phillips – The Table of Less Valued Knights

Rachel Seiffert – The Walk Home

Kamila Shamsie – A God in Every Stone

Ali Smith – How to be Both

Sara Taylor – The Shore

Anne Tyler – A Spool of Blue Thread

Sarah Waters – The Paying Guests

Jemma Wayne – After Before

PP Wong – The Life of a Banana

Calling all budding young authors!

Have you got an aspiring young writer in the family? The spaghetti yeti

Budding young writers can have a spring in their step thanks to a great new story competition. And there is even the chance for them to have their story read out at Leeds Central Library as the prize. The Yorkshire Evening Post has teamed up with Leeds Library and Information Service for this Spring-themed contest.

To enter children just have to write a story of 200 words or less. It must also start with the following intro which is not included in the word count.

“It really felt like the first day of Spring. Amongst the snowdrops I saw something sparkling on the grass…….. ”

There will be categories for primary schoolchildren, secondary schoolchildren and pupils at special schools. The winning stories will then be read out by Leeds illustrator and author of Mariella Mystery Investigates series, Kate Pankhurst on April 10. The winners will also have a chance to meet Kate.

All entries by email to hannah.start@jpress.co.uk or sent in using the share a story button  www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk by March 20th 2015. Entries may appear in the paper and online.

Usual Johnston Press rules apply, go to http://www.johnstonpress.co.uk/competition