Librarian’s Choice: Printmaking

This blog is from Chloe, an Assistant Community Librarian based in the West of the city.

Here are my top five recently discovered printmaking books! I found them inspirational in making me want to learn new techniques or explore them playfully in different ways. I’m always looking out for accessible art projects that you can try at home, and the majority of these books have templates to get you started learning techniques before progressing to creating your own designs. I have ranked the following titles in order of my favourites…

Chloe Printmaking UnleashedPrintmaking Unleashed: More Than 50 Techniques for Expressive Mark Making by Tracy Bautista

DIY printmaking at its best, this book is a feast for the eyes with gorgeous combinations of pattern, colour and composition explored through a vast variety of playful mark making techniques! The book covers DIY techniques for all abilities in an accessible and affordable way using common materials to get amazing printmaking results. From creating your own stencils using hot glue, carved wooden blocks or materials such as rubber bands and toothpicks, to printing vintage lace textures or creating Sgraffito Doodles (scratching into acrylic paint on top of Perspex) there is a technique everyone will enjoy and want to pursue!
Examples of other expressive mark making techniques include gesso fabric prints (using resits to incorporate texture onto canvas), digital photography stencils (using Photoshop), silkscreen painting (using an embroidery hoop and acrylic), recycled plastic prints (using interesting patterns on plastic to print), masking tape and crochet string resists, and hand cut stencils.

Chloe Making an ImpressionMaking an Impression: Designing & Creating Artful Stamps by Geninne Zlatikis

This book makes you want you to design and make your own collection of stamps for printmaking. It begins with the basic principles of materials required and a selection of templates in the back in order to get you started, then delves into inspiring and exciting techniques.

Aside from creating your own stamps, techniques to try using them to create art work include: stamps with positive and negative space, experimenting with textures of surfaces you’re printing on, and how to create repetition through different angles and colours. There are inspiration ideas for how to use your stamps to create your own personal artwork, as well as a variety of projects to choose from: journals, pillows, t-shirts, and wall art to name a few. My favourite projects I look forward to creating are the bookplate and accordion journal. I’m also particularly excited about the cyanotype (sun printing) technique which I’ve never tried, and exploring positive and negative patterns.

Chloe The Printmaking BookThe Printmaking Book: Projects & Techniques in the Art of Hand-Printing by Vanessa Mooncie

This book also covers the techniques relief, screen, sun and mono printing in addition to image transfers and stencils; however it is aimed at transforming ordinary items with hand printed designs. Again techniques are accessible in that they are fun and easy to try at home, and templates are available to help get you started. From ceramic, lino, woodcut, silk and stencil screen printing, there are plenty of projects to try the techniques in: printed plastic jewellery, photographic transfers onto mirror, wallpaper, and solar plates (metal sheets coated in photosensitive polymer which are used as a printmaking surface).

Marbles, bottle and jar lids, string – you name it and I’ve been collecting it to try in printmaking since reading this book! I look forward to trying the book cover project and would be excited to use the silk printing technique. I’d also like to try the negative photograph cyanotype technique as I’d never heard of it before!

Chloe How to Print FabricHow to Print Fabric by Zeena Shah

This book explains everything you’ve ever wanted to know about creating beautiful hand-printed fabrics easily at home, and again this one has templates to get you started. It begins with the importance of mark making (one of the most exciting and experimental aspects in printmaking) and covers techniques including relief and stencilling. It progresses to screen printing for beginners (using an embroider hoop), and advanced stencil screen printing (using Photo Emulsion). It covers useful information about inks, dyes and fabrics and also has a section on the key concepts in print design, including positive and negative space, motifs and various repeat techniques. The rest of the book is brimming with twenty different techniques for printing on fabric, each followed by a simple sewing project. You can also mix and match printmaking techniques throughout the book for any of the sewing projects. Some examples of the techniques include: bleach mark printing, screen printing with freezer paper stencils, lint roller printing, and watercolour mark printing. A selection of projects include tablet sleeves, bean bags and Furoshiki cloths (ancient Japanese cloths used to wrap objects).

I’ve had some bad experiences sewing (perhaps it’s to do with the fact I can’t sew a straight line), but this doesn’t put me off any of the projects! I’d particularly like to use the lino block technique for the tablet cover project, and lino roller printing to make a Furoshiki wrapping cloth.

Chloe Art LabArt Lab for Kids: 52 Creative Adventures in Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, Paper and Mixed Media by Susan Schwake

This book is a fantastic reminder of how being playful in your approach to making art can produce fantastic results, (you’re never too old to experiment)! With around twenty pages dedicated to printmaking, instructions are easy to understand and ‘quick guides’ to the basic principles of the following techniques: found object, stencil silk screen, string, polystyrene, mono, stencil and relief printing. Each technique includes an example of an artist working with the medium which is inspiring and makes you pause to consider how you could push the boundaries of the technique further. This is the only book I’ve chosen that doesn’t contain templates or projects but this is fine – the results of experimenting with techniques are works of art in their own right.

I got excited about the gelatin technique as the author described it as their most favourite and addictive process! It’s a way of producing textural-looking, layered monoprints without a press… Ink floats on the surface of the gelatin so you can work on your print over a long period of time. However I want to do more research to check the process is animal friendly before trying it out!

Zines, zines, zines

This blog comes from Claire, a librarian based at Studio 12 in Leeds Central library.

zineblog-leedsreadsI’m here to tell you about a new obsession. Zines!

Zines are the ultimate expression of the do-it-yourself ethic. It can look handmade. A zine is a functional vehicle for self-expression. It is generally a short run periodical produced for passion rather than an intention to make money. Zines are an immediate and disposable popular literary form and are typically less formal. A zine can take on topics that the mainstream usually ignores.

I was first introduced to zines through a workshop with Wur Bradford for International Women’s Day last year. The workshop took place over 3 weeks and by the end of the workshop we had learnt about letterpress, photocopying techniques and distribution. But what struck me the most was the pure range of subject, techniques and people the activity brought together. Here were maybe 8 women from diverse backgrounds who hadn’t met before talking openly about what it was to be a woman, looking at their cultures, experiences and backgrounds. The craft created an inclusive and relaxed atmosphere for learning and listening.

My colleague Sapphia suggested we take zines to libraries. We facilitated our first zine workshop at Moor Allerton Library, again for International Women’s Day. We haven’t looked back since partnering with Leeds Arts and Minds to produce zines with varying groups across Leeds for their This Is Me Exhibition hosted in Room700 Leeds Central Library.

We have since secured funding and will be putting on our on Exhibition in March next year. The exhibition will feature zines on a variety of topics including Local History, Poetry, Art, Culture and Books(obviously)

We recently created a zine with fellow Librarians looking at their favourite books. We were looking for book reviews, quotes and images to depict their passion for books and the librarians delivered!

zineblog-leedsreads2Our first zine page was created by Senior Communities Librarian Greg Stringer and looks at the book Brighton Rock. Greg said “It’s one of my favourite books (and films) – the central piece of pink and white paper jumped out at me right at the beginning, suggesting a stick of rock and I tried to find images to build around that that reflected either the era the book was set in (the cars, fashion) and the building suspense and terror developed in the plot or related to particular characters (Pinkie/violin music). There had to be some degree of inventiveness throughout if ideas for images weren’t readily available.”

zineblog-leedsreads4The Secret Garden was a bit of a favourite amongst our librarians.
Assistant Communities Librarian Chloe Derrick said “To maximise time I spent creating the Zine I gathered materials to work with directly. I avoided technology (photocopying, printing, etc.), started with the background and ended with the text. I only used part of a quote from the book so the meaning of the words could be ambiguous. When making the Zine I thought about how much I love the creativity within my role and considered events such Family Art Sessions at Headingley, as Zines really appeal to both adults and children.”

zineblog-leedsreads10This zine page was inspired by The Great Gatsby and created by Assistant Communities Librarian Mark Kirby. “The first thing that sprung to mind from the book was the valley of ashes, where a huge billboard looms over everything. That’s why I chose the block text from the adverts on a murky wallpaper background. To show NYC and the Roaring Twenties, I attempted a Manhattan skyscraper out of filmstrips, and some music manuscript for the Jazz Age. Plus some added party glamour via the dancing girls, courtesy of the Metro newspaper.”

zineblog-leedsreads7Assistant Communities Librarian Angie Palmer created this beautiful page in honour of The Book Thief.

 

 

 

You can view a full copy of the zine
https://issuu.com/studio12leeds/docs/librarian_zine
Zines can help us to celebrate our love of reading, research and culture by giving us a method to share our passions in groups, by distribution and by doing!

Librarian’s Choice: Reduce, Recycle, Re-love

I have been an ardent collector of curios and the second hand for many years. My main thrill is to rummage and forage through other people’s trash to find an item I can refashion and treasure. I am not ashamed to call myself a skip surfer, car boot obsessive and charity shop aficionado.

What started as a means of buying cheap second hand clothes and furnishings as a student became a lifelong obsession with all things old and vintage.  Old and abandoned objects have a story to tell, they connect us to the past, and I am naturally drawn to the nostalgia and style of bygone times.

In this disposable and consumeristic world where ‘old’ is considered antiquated and unfashionable I see an opportunity to breathe new life into things which deserve a second chance. Once restored or up-cycled I have the privilege of owning something that is often unique and  well – crafted  whilst having all the pleasure and satisfaction of having added my own creative flourishes.

Over the years Leeds Libraries have been an amazing resource for books on art and design , interiors and crafts, all of which excite and inspire me. More recently there has seen a blossoming of publications on upcycling. Below I have listed some of my recommendations. Some of the projects I have undertaken at home to good effect, others are on my ‘to do list’ when I can find the time. Some of the books just beckon to be borrowed as the pictures alone are enchanting. You need not be an expert crafter or sewer; all of the projects have easy to follow instructions. and require very few tools. it’s amazing what you can do with a staple gun alone.

I hope you feel inspired to give it a go. Enjoy!

angie-thrifty-chicThrifty chic: interior style on a shoestring by Liz Bauwens

‘Thrifty Chic’ shows you how to revive and revamp to create an eclectic and unique interior style on a shoestring. I particularly like the idea of a striped hand painted staircase. Best to use a quick dry paint for this one and wait till the kids and the dogs are out of the house.

angie-junk-geniusJunk genius: stylish ways to repurpose everyday objects, with over 80 projects and ideas by Juliette Goggin

In this book you’ll find rewarding and money-saving recycling projects. My favourites include lighting made out of old kitchenaliia. It also contains a great chapter on creating jewellery out of old jigsaw pieces, thimbles, typewriter keys and watch faces. A must have ‘book to borrow’ for any Steam Punk fans out there.

angie-repurposed-libraryThe repurposed library by Lisa Occhipinti

A celebration of the possibilities that books have to offer as an art material. This book takes my passion for books one step further, It includes 33 projects to make out of books, my favourites are: a lettered wreath, a literary lampshade; and a book ledge made from beautiful old hardbacks.

angie-reviveRevive!: inspired interiors from recycled materials by Jacqueline Mulvaney

This is the only book where more advanced sewing skills than my own are required. This would suit an intermediate or confident sewer. Whilst I have tackled some basic upholstery in the past I haven’t quite mastered some of the more advanced features of my sewing machine. However, I do have a growing collection of fabrics which are in need of refashioning and embellishing. This book shows you how to make and decorate throws, cushions, curtains and blinds. The Inspiration Board featured is an art piece in itself.

angie-vintageCreating the vintage look: 35 ways to upcycle for a stylish home by Ellie Laycock

This book offers you simple step by step guidance to create unique homewares. It makes you to look at unloved items in a totally new way, and encourages you to think before you throw.
It is a good starting point for anyone new to up-cycling . It is the answer to all your birthday and Christmas conundrums, as from now on you can just DIY it. My favourites are the stamp collection placemats ( I have done this myself with great success ), the cheese grater pen pot, the tea set bird feeders and the dish towel curtain to name just a few…..

angie-recycled-homeRecycled home: transform your home using salvaged materials by Rebecca Proctor

This book features 50 stylish craft projects using salvaged materials, with step-by-step illustrations to guide you through to completion . No special skills are needed.
My favourites include the cosy hot water bottle cover and patchwork book wallpaper. The rag rug bath mat is an on-going project I have yet to complete at home. My main advice to aspiring be rag ruggers is firstly just Do It! Basic rag rugging is really so simple and can even be done in front of the T.V. It is an ideal hobby for all finger twitchers, nail biters and smokers will miraculously cease as they become totally immersed. Alternatively, use it as part of a regular meditative practice whilst listening to music or an absorbing audio book. A tip for free is to start small don’t be overly ambitious in size or scale as in my case it will take forever to finish.

angie-flea-market-chicFlea market chic: the thrifty way to create a stylish home by Liz Bauwens

This book is on my Christmas Wish List, it is crammed full of eclectic interiors which mix the old and new to create a totally unique look. I am particular drawn to the shed and cabins section as my long term ambition is to make the ultimate downsize and move into one!

‘Flea Market Chic’ will show you how to spot the clever find in a pile of junk, where to look and how to negotiate. Sourcing materials need not be expensive or difficult, if you ask around. start with family and friends, use recycling sites such as Freecycle or use the Freeads on Gumtree; Visit your local scrap store whether that be Scrap Shed in Leeds or the Cone Exchange in Harrogate. Start using your local charity shops, for a few pence you are supporting the developing world or helping good causes nearer to home. Even better why not volunteer? Try out online auction sites such as Ebay, bargains are to be had with a little research and patience. Look in roadside skips I’ve always found people are happy to give you things would otherwise have gone to landfill.

angie-fine-little-dayFine little day: ideas, collections and interiors by Elisabeth Dunker

Take a peek into the fascinating life of Elisabeth Dunker: blogger, writer, stylist, designer, photographer and artist. This is a woman of many talents, and the book showcases her unique skill and style. Her handmade pot holder blanket is an inspiration to behold. This book makes me want to move to Scandinavia and live in her cabin!

angie-cheap-chicCheap chic: affordable ideas for a relaxed home by Emily Chalmers

Just a lovely coffee table book, enjoy flicking through the pages for the sheer pleasure of it
If you are in need for inspiration then Pinterest is the answer to all your dreams.  If you have a smart phone or IPad/tablet download the Pinterest App and create your own pin board of ideas.
If you want to have a go selling your handmade wares or turn a crafting hobby into a living then check out crafting websites such as Etsy and Folksy to see what you can sell. They each employ a basic level of quality control so a bowl made out of play dough whilst fun to make probably wouldn’t cut the muster.

angie-rediscovered-treasuresRediscovered treasures by Ellen Dyrop

This book is a ‘must read’ for anyone hoping to style their own wedding as there are centrepieces and accessories that you can make that would add an air of romance to any humble village hall. On my wish list to make is the family heirloom cushion using old transferable photos and would make a thoughtful and memorable present for your nearest and dearest.

angie-thrifty-lampshades50 thrifty DIY lampshades by Adeline Lobut

I’ve never understood why lampshades so expensive to buy when the principle is so easy. What’s more you can use a fabric of your choice and add as many embellishments as your heart desires. The market has begun to recognise the upcycling trend and there are now DIY lampshade kits available to buy. Alternatively, borrow this book from Leeds libraries and have the pleasure of making one from scratch. I love the idea of using old books and men’s ties to create a stand or shade. If you want to show off your eco-friendly credentials there are even instructions for making a living lamp made out of green foliage.

angie-homespun-styleHomespun style by Selina Lake

This is book once borrowed I had to buy..
Indeed why all these books beckon to me is they inspire me to be creative. I hope you are inspired to have a go too!

Angie, Assistant Community Librarian