Fiction this week – lots of blockbusters

 

The Museum of Extraordinary ThingsThe new fiction this week includes lots of paperback copies of blockbusters

‘Silken Bonds’, ‘Love Match’ and ‘The First Rebellion’ by M. C. Beaton, ‘The Bootlegger’ by Clive Cussler and ‘By its Cover’ by Donna Leon, to name but a few.

Thriller lovers there’s loads of copies of ‘Wolf’ by Mo Hader, or try ‘The Dead in the Vaulted Arches’ by  C Alan Bradley or ‘The Skeleton Road’ by Val McDermid. – When a skeleton is discovered hidden at the top of a gothic Victorian building in Edinburgh, cold case squad detective Karen Pirie is given the task of identifying the decades-old bones. However, her investigation leads her back to past conflicts, false identities and buried secrets

Something coming through‘Something coming through’ is scifi by Paul J McAuley The Jackaroo have given humanity 15 worlds and the means to reach them. They’re a chance to start over, but they’re also littered with ruins and artifacts left by the Jackaroo’s previous clients.

‘The Museum of Extraordinary Things’ by Alice Hoffman, Alice is set in New York City, 1911. Meet Coralie Sardie, circus girl, web-fingered mermaid, shy only daughter of Professor Sardie and raised in the bizarre surroundings of his Museum of Extraordinary Things. And meet Eddie Cohen, a handsome young immigrant who has run away from his painful past and his Orthodox family to become a photographer, documenting life on the teeming city streets. One night by the freezing waters of the Hudson River, Coralie stumbles across Eddie, who has become enmeshed in the case of a missing girl, and the fates of these two hopeful outcasts collide as they search for truth, beauty, love and freedom in tumultuous times.

Just want a relaxing read – ‘A lesson in love’ by Gervaise Phinn fits the bill

Try something new this week

A spool of blue thread

Who is Tom Ditto?What have we got for your delectation this week?

Check out the full fiction list 

Anne Tyler’s new novel ‘A Spool of Blue Thread’ is on our list – the story of how Abby and Red fell in love in July 1959 and their life…

We quite fancy the new murder mysteries ‘Obsession’ by J.D. Robb  and ‘The devil you know’ by Elisabeth De Mariaffi sounds good too.

How about trying Kyril  Bonfiglioli, who is the author of the Mortdecai books if you saw the film.

The Boston girlDon’t know whether it’s 50 Shades territory but Kresley Cole’s ‘The Master’’s blurb says: ‘A need colder than Siberian winter meets an attitude hotter than the Florida sun in New York Times bestselling author Kresley Cole’s sultry new ‘Game The masterMaker’ novel’

A bit more fun ‘Who is Tom Ditto?’ by Danny Wallace – We join the action just as our ‘hero’ Tom, (early thirties, reads the ‘news’ on the radio) finds out that his girlfriend has NOT left him.

With the backdrop of World War I and ‘written with the same immense emotional impact that has made Anne Diamant’s previous novels bestsellers’, ‘The Boston Girl’ is a portrait of one woman’s complicated life in the early 20th century.

 

What’s new in fiction this week

Holy cowCairoThe Fiction Hotlist is out!

Try X Files’ David Duchovny’s ‘Holy Cow’ – Elsie Bovary is a cow and a pretty happy one at that. Until one night, Elsie sneaks out of the pasture and finds herself drawn to the farmhouse. Through the window, she sees the farmer’s family gathered around a bright Box God – and what the Box God reveals about something called an ‘industrial meat farm’ shakes Elsie’s understanding of her world to its core. The only solution? To escape to a better, safer world. And so a motley crew is formed: Elsie; Shalom, a grumpy pig who’s recently converted to Crash & burnJudaism; and Tom, a The lovers of Amherstsuave turkey who can’t fly, but can work an iPhone with his beak

Or if you like thrillers, there’s a new Lisa Gardner ‘Crash and Burn’  Try some Australian fiction with ‘Cairo’ by Chris Womersley.

Or as it’s Valentine’s Day on Saturday, how about ‘The lovers of Amherst’ by William Nicholson – ‘The story of two loves: one past, one present, both intimately entwined with Emily Dickinson’s life’.