International Women’s Day – The Lemonade Syllabus

This blog is from Kat, a librarian based in the North East of the city.

The Lemonade Syllabus

Beyoncé may not be everyone’s kind of feminist but no one can argue with the effect she has had upon a generation of Independent Women who grew up listening to Bills, Bills, Bills, Independent Women, Survivor, Irreplaceable, Single Ladies and Run The World (Girls). One of the greatest moments of my life was seeing her perform Single Ladies at Glastonbury – I have never seen so many men look confused at all the enthusiastic women in the crowd.

Last year she released a visual album Lemonade (which is available to borrow from the Music Library) which inspired doctoral student Candice Benbow to create the #LemonadeSyllabus hashtag and social media campaign. As a result of this Candice released the syllabus as a free downloadable resource of over 250 works centred around the lives of Black women. Within the first week, it was downloaded over 40,000 times.

A selection of the titles featured are currently on display at Chapeltown Library and features both fiction and non-fiction coving a range of subjects which centre around Black Womanhood :

kat-raisin-in-the-sunA raisin in the sun by Lorraine Hansberry

Set in 1950s Chicago, A Raisin in the Sun is the classic play about a black family’s struggle for equality. The play was originally published in the USA in 1959 but has since become a standard text in American schools.

kat-americanahAmericanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

From the award-winning author of ‘Half of a Yellow Sun’, a powerful story of love, race and identity. As teenagers in Lagos, Ifemelu and Obinze fall in love. Their Nigeria is under military dictatorship, and people are fleeing the country if they can. The self-assured Ifemelu departs for America. There she suffers defeats and triumphs, finds and loses relationships, all the while feeling the weight of something she never thought of back home: race.

kat-blues-legaciesBlues legacies and black feminism by Angela Y. Davis

In this work Angela Davies provides the historical, social, and political contexts with which to reinterpret the lyrics and performances of Gertrude ‘Ma’ Rainey, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday.

kat-snow-birdBoy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

‘Boy, Snow, Bird’ is a deeply moving novel about three women and the strange connection between them. It confirms Helen Oyeyemi’s place as one of the most original and dynamic literary voices of her generation.

 

kat-letter-to-my-daughterLetter to my daughter by Maya Angelou

Dedicated to the daughter she never had but sees all around her, Letter to My Daughter reveals Maya Angelou’s path to living well and living a life with meaning. Told in her own inimitable style, this book transcends genres and categories: guidebook, memoir, poetry, and pure delight. Here in short spellbinding essays are glimpses of the tumultuous life that led Angelou to an exalted place in American letters and taught her lessons in compassion and fortitude: how she was brought up by her indomitable grandmother in segregated Arkansas, taken in at thirteen by her more worldly and less religious mother, and grew to be an awkward, six-foot-tall teenager whose first experience of loveless sex paradoxically left her with her greatest gift, a son.

kat-a-piece-of-cakeA piece of cake : a memoir by Cupcake Brown

‘A Piece of Cake’ is the story of a girl named Cupcake, which begins when, aged 11, she is orphaned and placed in the care of sadistic foster parents. Neglected and sexually abused she fell into drug abuse and gang culture before turning her life around.

 

kat-the-bluest-eyeThe bluest eye by Toni Morrison

The Bluest Eye is Toni Morrison’s first novel, a book heralded for its richness of language and boldness of vision. Set in the author’s girlhood hometown of Lorain, Ohio, it tells the story of black, eleven-year-old Pecola Breedlove. Pecola prays for her eyes to turn blue so that she will be as beautiful and beloved as all the blond, blue-eyed children in America. In the autumn of 1941, the year the marigolds in the Breedloves’ garden do not bloom. Pecola’s life does change- in painful, devastating ways.
With its vivid evocation of the fear and loneliness at the heart of a child’s yearning, and the tragedy of its fulfillment the Bluest Eye remains one of Tony Morrisons’s most powerful, unforgettable novels- and a significant work of American fiction.

kat-the-book-of-phoenixThe book of Phoenix by Nnedi Okorafor

They call her many things – a research project, a test-subject, a specimen. An abomination. But she calls herself Phoenix, an ‘accelerated woman’ – a genetic experiment grown and raised in Manhattan’s famous Tower 7, the only home she has ever known. Although she’s only two years old, Phoenix has the body and mind of an adult – and powers beyond imagining. Phoenix is an innocent, happy to live quietly in Tower 7, reading voraciously and basking in the love of Saeed, another biologically altered human. Until the night that Saeed witnesses something so terrible that he takes his own life. Devastated, Phoenix begins to search for answers – only to discover that everything that she has ever known is a lie.

kat-we-should-allWe Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

What does “feminism” mean today? That is the question at the heart of We Should All Be Feminists, a personal, eloquently-argued essay—adapted from her much-viewed TEDx talk of the same name—by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the award-winning author of Americanah and Half of a Yellow Sun. With humor and levity, here Adichie offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century—one rooted in inclusion and awareness. She shines a light not only on blatant discrimination, but also the more insidious, institutional behaviors that marginalize women around the world, in order to help readers of all walks of life better understand the often masked realities of sexual politics. Throughout, she draws extensively on her own experiences—in the U.S., in her native Nigeria, and abroad—offering an artfully nuanced explanation of why the gender divide is harmful for women and men, alike. Argued in the same observant, witty and clever prose that has made Adichie a bestselling novelist, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman today—and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.

kat-you-cantYou can’t keep a good woman down by Alice Walker

A natural evolution from the earlier, much-acclaimed collection In Love & Trouble, these fourteen provocative and often humorous stories show women oppressed but not defeated. These are hopeful stories about love, lust, fame, and cultural thievery, the delight of new lovers, and the rediscovery of old friends, affirmed even across self-imposed color lines.

In case you were wondering my favourite song from Lemonade is Hold Up, and my ultimate Beyoncé track would have to be Survivor – I will survive and keep on surviving!

Librarian’s Choice – Teen Reads

This blog comes from Sapphia, a librarian based in the North East of the city.

I hit a bit of a wall. I have been super busy. But I also stopped reading. I don’t like it. I am a librarian. I looked at all the beautiful books, but couldn’t quite bring myself to read any of them. So I set myself a challenge, to read teen books. I worked on the theory that they would be easier to crack on with. I forget I’m not a teenager anymore! Seriously though, generally they are great, and even though you don’t have to worry about having friends at school anymore or whether you’re home before your parents can scream at you, we still go through similar scenarios and we still suffer the anxiety and self doubt that we did as young adults. Phew it feels nice to have got through it, but it’s also good to know you did, and remember now, you are capable of even more.
And one plus point, teenage books are definitely quicker to read.

sapp-suicide-notesSuicide Notes from Beautiful Girls – Lynn Weingarten

I loved this book! It’s full of plot twists and your constantly wondering what’s going to happen next! June and Delia used to be friends. Delia is wild and out of control, June is timid and fascinated that someone like Delia would want to be friends with her. They drifted apart. Then June finds out Delia has killed herself. She has left a suicide note. June is overcome with guilt for not answering Delia’s last call. But why did she call? When Delia’s death becomes suspicious, June decides to investigate. This novel is great at highlighting the all consuming turbulence of friendship and how toxic it can be. Its hard to tell you anymore without hinting to the plot twists but the end is immense and truly gripping, I couldn’t stop reading! Give it a go. It’s a quick read but adult in content so it captivates you throughout and you can relate to the characters.

sapp-our-chemical-heartsOur Chemical Hearts – Krystal Sutherland

For lovers of John Green and Rainbow Rowell. Henry Page is sensitive. Maybe too sensitive at first I won’t lie to you, you think yep this is a teen book, I won’t be able to read this. But I kept going and I got drawn in, Grace is a captivating character. Grace is the new girl at school and she’s weird. She dresses in boys clothes and has no interest in anyone. Grace and Henry are both nominated to be the editor of their school paper and this means that they have to be around each other. Henry realises that it’s not about what a girl looks like it’s who they are that makes you like them…..but Grace has got some serious issues. And you just don’t trust her. Full of teenage angst, first love and movie references, including Harry Potter and Snatch. See how the characters explore and experience grief and how it can completely take over your life. (Only if you’re a teen, we’re adults now….yer we wish.) But there are also many forms of grief.

sapp-instructionsInstructions for a Second Hand Heart – Tamsyn Murray

One of the the teen titles chosen for this years Leeds Book Awards, I chose this book for the interesting title and book cover. I like a good cover. I didn’t read the back, I just read the book. I really liked it, I had a free day and I read it in the day. Niamh constantly fights her twin brother, always living in his shadow she’s about to be experience a future completely different, one where it feels like everything has fallen apart. Jonny has been in hospital for what feels like his whole life, every day he’s kept alive by a machine and wonders if this will be the day he will die? His best friend is Em, Em has cancer. To get them through the endless days in the hospital they create an ‘unbucket’ list for all of the things they will do together when they get out. But this is a book about facing the future, no matter how scary and painful it can be, and realising that the best way to heal your heart is to share it with others, no matter how much it hurts.

sapp-the-gracesThe Graces – Laure Eve

I wasn’t as keen on this book. Recommended by Mr. B of Mr.B’s Book Emporium I thought i would give it a go. River doesn’t know if Magic really exists, but when she moves school and meets the ‘Graces’ she suddenly finds herself desperate to be a part of the group that everyone loves. A modern day Matilda, with less of the mischief and endearment and instead, teen angst and a dash of witch craft. This is one for the ‘Twilight’ series fans. I think this was why I wasn’t too keen on it, it’s full of romance and I think I was hoping for more ‘The Craft’. Thinking about it, maybe it’s good the book didn’t go there for teen readers? This being said it’s likely that if you are a teen or know one, they might love it, can we all remember how big Twilight was? FYI I’m team ‘Werewolf’.
There will be more books to follow. It could start all over again!

sapp-monster-callsA Monster Calls – Patrick Ness – Conception by Soibhan Dowd

I really loved this book! Recommended by the Zoella Book Club and with all the hype with the new film adaption I felt like this had to be on a teen reading list. It was nothing like I expected. A wild ancient Monster visits Connor, he has been expecting one from his nightmares, but this monster is quite different. As well as the monster Connor is having to deal with his mothers illness, his dad starting a new family in America, his grandma getting in the way and the school bullies he has to face every day. The Monster doesn’t care about any of these things, he is here to tell Conner 3 stories and from him in return, he wants the most dangerous thing of all, the truth. I read this book in a day. I recommend everyone to read it and remember how it felt to be a child.

sapp-girl-upGirl UP! – Laura Bates

Ok – so this isn’t a fiction book. Its a book I think is really important. I needed this book as a teenager! It would have saved me from myself, doubt and envy. Ok, not completely, but it definitely would have helped. A non- fiction book with comic illustrations this is a book for teen girls and maybe even boys, talking about everything from body issues, identity and sexuality. And do you remember all those quizzes we are all obsessed with as a teen, wanting to be allocated in the ‘best’ category or body shape? Like really how did we even let this happen? Social media suckers us in and it does influence us. As much as we wish it didn’t or try to deny it. They have us wanting to conform to something we are not.
Laura Bates has a movement. If we educate teens and our kids even earlier, they can make informed decisions, knowing the consequences. But mostly, making the choice for themselves and not giving into peer pressure or social ideals, even it’s about responding to that nude Snapchat. I vote using the snapchat stickers Laura provides, just saying.
There’s also lots of great sign posting with useful contacts and info. Again, where was this when I was a teen?

 

Librarian’s Choice: Recommended reads for LGBT History Month

PrintThis blog comes from Alex, a library assistant on our peripatetic team.

Love is in the air… — yes, but so is hail and frost you might say. Fair point, it is after all February and, let’s face it, the weather is what it is. But suppose for a moment, we could travel anywhere we’d like to without queuing at the airport or drying our accounts out. Imagine we could do that whiles being wrapped up in a woolly blanket, enjoying a deliciously warm hot chocolate. Now suppose that I’m not just daydreaming; after all there is one wonderful thing we can all do for each other this February. Let’s take advice from our wise Scandinavian cousins: let’s all get hygge and let the romance of these stories warm our hearts because, is there any more magical way to travel than through the pages of a gripping book?

Inspired by LGBT* History Month 2017, I have chosen some of the most heart breaking love stories to get us all through February.

Picture books:

alex-tango-makes-threeAnd Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, illustrated by Henry Cole.

For all the animal lovers out there, there is probably no better love story than the one between Roy and Silo. Two penguins at New York Central Park Zoo, Roy and Silo might appear as an odd couple. Whiles their fellow penguins are preparing themselves for the joy and challenges of parenthood, Roy and Silo are worried they might never be able to become dads… or will they? There is only one way to find out.

Teenage Fiction:

alex-you-know-me-wellYou know me well by Nina LaCour & David Levithan

Friends at first sight, Mark and Kate have never spoken to each other until one fateful night their lives collide: Kate is running away from a chance of meeting the girl she has loved from afar, while Mark is in love with his best friend who may or may not loves him back. They are both lost and finding each other is the last thing on their minds., though they don’t realize just how important they will become to each other.

alex-fans-of-teh-impossible-lifeFans of the impossible life by Kate Scelsa

“May we live impossibly.” Sebby said when he opened his eyes. “Against all odds. May people look at us and wonder how such jewels can sparkle in the sad desert of the world. May we live the impossible life”.
Echoing Stephen Chbosky’s much celebrated novel “The perks of being a wallflower”, “Fans of the impossible life” is the story of love, loss, growing up and finding friends who can see through you and the person you’re trying to become. The story follows Sebby and his best friend Mira on their impromptu road trips and magical rituals designed to fix parts of their broken lives. But what will happen when Jeremy, the painfully shy and isolated art nerd, enters the picture?

alex-outOut by Joanna Kenrick, illustrated by Julia Page

This dyslexia friendly book is a short but gripping story of love, friendship and solidarity. “Out” poignantly portrays the difficult experience of ‘‘coming out’ and the struggle with unrequited love.

Teenage non-fiction:

alex-beyond-magentaBeyond Magenta: transgender teens speak out

Author and photographer Susan Kuklin meets and interviews six transgender and gender-neutral teens to portray them before, during, and after their personal acknowledgment of gender identity, empathetically exploring their emotional and physical transitioning.

 

Adult fiction:

alex-oranges-are-notOranges are not the only fruit by Jeanette Winterson

If you grew up gay among religious fundamentalists, Jeanette Winterson feels your pain. Oranges, the novelist and critic’s 1985 autobiographical debut novel, follows an English lesbian girl coming of age in a Pentecostal community.

alex-carolCarol by Patricia Highsmith

“And she did not have to ask if this was right, no one had to tell her, because this could not have been more right or perfect.” Previously published as “The Price of Salt”, most of us are probably familiar with Todd Haynes 2015 rendering of Patricia Highsmith’s lesbian novel. In Carol, two women from different backgrounds—one a department store clerk who dreams of a better life, the other a wealthy wife — strike up a passionate love affair with each other in 1950s New York.

alex-rubyfruit-jungleRubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Widely considered to be the lesbian coming of age novel par excellence, “Rubyfruit Jungle” follows the life of Molly Bolt, adopted daughter of a poor US family, who possesses remarkable beauty and who is aware of her lesbianism from early childhood. Sex, love and betrayal are at the heart of this turbulent coming to age, which often mirrors Brown’s own experience of being an emerging lesbian author in 1970s New York.

alex-orlandoOrlando: a Biography by Virginia Woolf.

“I’m sick to death of this particular self. I want another.” For the classics lovers amongst us, there is perhaps no book which better portrays the elusive essence of gender like Virginia Woolf’s “Orlando”. Spanning a lifetime of almost three centuries, Orland accompanies us on a poetic journey of rediscovery which challenges conventional assumptions of gender as a binary concept.

 

Adult non-fiction:

alex-queerQueer: a graphic history by Meg John Barker, illustrated by Julia Scheele (eBook)

Activist-academic Meg John Barker and cartoonist Julia Scheele illuminate the histories of queer thought and LGBTQ* action in this ground breaking non-fiction graphic novel. You can download the eBook from our library catalogues.

Gay life and culture: a world history by Robert Aldrich

In the years since Stonewall, the world has witnessed an outpouring of research, critical inquiry, and re-interpretation of gay life and culture. This book draws on ground breaking new material to present a comprehensive survey of all things gay, stretching back to ancient history and ranging to the present days. Critically acclaimed historian Robert Aldrich with the support of ten leading scholars juxtaposes thought-provoking essays with an extensive selection of images, many never before seen. This masterful combination reveals the story behind gay culture from the industrialized world to the remotest corners of tribal New Guinea.

alex-art-and-queer-cultureArt and queer culture by Catherine Lord and Richard Meyer

A comprehensive survey covering 125 years of art that has constructed, contested or otherwise responded to alternative forms of sexuality. The book traces the rich visual legacy of art’s relationship to queer culture, from the emergence of homosexuality as an identity in the late nineteenth century to the pioneering ‘genderqueers’ of the early twenty-first century.

 

For comic book lovers:

alex-prideThe Pride by Joe Glass and Mike Stock

Have you ever been sick of being misrepresented? Of having no one like you to look up to? Have you ever wanted to change everything?
Then you need to join FabMan, Wolf, Muscle Mary, Frost, Twink, Bear, Angel and White Trash on their mission to help people and improve LGBT representation. Wanting to fight for change, FabMan has formed PRIDE, the world’s premier LGBTQ supergroup. Not exactly receiving the desired response, the group faces opposition from the confrontational Justice Division and the nefarious Reverend. After a serious trial by fire, the team find themselves the only super team in the world capable of stopping The Reverend’s diabolical plot for world domination.

alex-juicy-motherJuicy mother: celebration by Jennifer Camper

Featuring work by and about queers, women and black artists, “Juicy Mother” is probably the queerest cartoon anthology you can get your hands on; these stories are not just exuberant and carefree, they are also a marvellous celebration of artistry and diversity.

 

alex-100-crushes100 crushes by Lim Elisha

100 Crushes compiles five years of queer comics by Elisha Lim, including excerpts from Sissy, The Illustrated Gentleman, Queer Child in the Eighties, and their cult series 100 Butches, as well as new work. It’s an absorbing documentary that travels through Toronto, Berlin, Singapore, and beyond in the form of interviews, memoirs, and gossip from an international queer vanguard.

A break from tradition

This blog is from Richard, deputy head of the library service.

My colleagues have recently started talking about some publishers (and book franchises) breaking away from their traditional offerings and supplementing these with a more grown-up content. Here I’m talking particularly about family favourites such as Enid Blyton and Ladybird; those of us who are in the 40+ category might see these new books on the shelf and look back with nostalgia at the adventures and fairy tales we grew up with – and we dutifully pick them up in response to a little tug on our heart-strings.

richard-brexit-islandFor example Enid Blyton’s ‘Famous Five’ have now become entangled with politics with Five on Brexit Island, they also experience an adventure in Five on A Strategy Away Day, and discover the benefits and challenges of going gluten free. There are also the Ladybird offerings, for example The Ladybird Book of Red Tape, and their popular How it Works series, which now includes: ‘The wife’, ‘The husband’, ‘The Dog’, etc. etc.

richard-strategy-away-daySo, are they any good…? Well, each to their own and, if I am honest, they are not going to be at the top of my next holiday reading list (perhaps too short!), however, for a little bit of fun and as break from the norm they are great. And, with the growing number of titles, it’ll soon be easier to choose one for a friend than selecting a birthday card for them! It would be a very grumpy 40+ who wouldn’t smile if given (the right) one of these.

richard-the-husbandMy own personal favourite franchise making a break from tradition has to be the Haynes workshop manuals. Here I do look back with nostalgia to the hot summers of my younger days – clambering over rusting heaps in a richly odorous scrap yard (diesel, petrol, oil, anti-freeze – scent really does have a strong memory) looking for that elusive replacement part for our aging Volkswagon, with my dad absolutely clear in his mind that, “We will find it!”, whereas to me the black and white photos never quite seemed to look like the actual ‘bit’ we needed.

richard-haynes-thomasBut, 30-odd years on, whilst you might not be able to find the parts anywhere (let alone your local scrap yard), the Haynes workshop manuals for The Starship Enterprise and Thomas the Tank Engine are simply fantastic; they are a treat for grown-ups looking back and a great way to get young enquiring minds thinking about the technical / scientific side of what they already enjoy. The mainstay remains automotive with around half of their 1500 titles falling in this area, but a whole world of reference from politics to space travel is available – borrow one from your local library, learn something new and have some fun.

Love is in the air – Epic Romance novels

Its not for everybody but February seems to me to be the best possible time to get stuck into one of these epic romances. These are love stories that stood the test of time, or adversity and lets be honest are probably much better for your soul than those red roses from the corner shop!

ali-outlanderOutlander by Diana Gabaldon

Claire Randall is leading a double life. She has a husband in one century – and a lover in another. In 1945, Claire Randall is back from the war and reunited with her husband on a second honeymoon in Scotland. Innocently she walks through a stone circle in the Highlands, and finds herself in a violent skirmish taking place in 1743. Suddenly she is a Sassenach, an outlander, in a country torn by war and by clan feuds. A wartime nurse, Claire can deal with the bloody wounds that face her. But it is harder to deal with the knowledge that she is in Jacobite Scotland and the carnage of Culloden is looming.

ali-bronze-horsemanThe Bronze Horseman by Paullina Simons

During the summer of 1941 the Metanov family are living a hard life in Leningrad. As the German armies advance their future looks bleak. For Tatiana, love arrives in the guise of Alexander, who harbours a deadly and extraordinary secret.

ali-time-traverllers-wifeThe Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

This is the story of Clare, a beautiful, strong-minded art student, and Henry, an adventuresome librarian, who have known each other since Clare was six and Henry was thirty-six, and were married when Clare was twenty-three and Henry thirty-one. Impossible but true, because Henry is one of the first people diagnosed with Chrono-Displacement Disorder: his genetic clock randomly resets and he finds himself misplaced in time, pulled to moments of emotional gravity from his life, past and future. His disappearances are spontaneous and unpredictable, and lend a spectacular urgency to Clare and Henry’s unconventional love story. That their attempt to live normal lives together is threatened by something they can neither prevent nor control makes their story intensely moving and entirely unforgettable.

ali-gone-with-teh-windGone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

Set against the historical backdrop of the American Civil War, this historical epic is a tale of a nation mortally divided. It is the love story of beautiful, ruthless Scarlet O’Hara and the dashing soldier of fortune, Rhett Butler.

ali-wuthering-heightsWuthering Heights by Emily Bronte

At the centre of this novel is the passionate love between Catherine Earnshaw and Heathcliff – recounted with such emotional intensity that a plain tale of the Yorkshire moors acquires the depth and simplicity of ancient tragedy.

ali-a-walk-to-rememberA Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks

Landon Carter would never have dreamed of asking Jamie Sullivan out, but a twist of fate throws them together. In the months that follow, Landon breaks down Jamie’s natural reserve and begins to get to know her, and to fall in love. Then he discovers that Jamie has a reason for not letting people close.

ali-the-thorn-birdsThe Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough

Powered by the dreams and struggles of three generations, this is the epic saga of a family rooted in the Australian sheep country. At the story’s heart is the love of Meggie Cleary, who can never possess the man she desperately adores, and Ralph de Bricassart, who rises from parish priest to the inner circles of the Vatican…but whose passion for Meggie will follow him all the days of his life.

 

ali-love-storyLove Story by Erich Segal

Oliver Barrett IV is a rich jock from a stuffy Wasp family on his way to a Harvard degree and a career in law. Jenny Cavilleri is a wisecracking working-class beauty studying music at Radcliffe. They are opposites in nearly every way – but they fell in love. This is their story.

ali-war-and-peaceWar and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

Tolstoy’s beguiling masterpiece entwines love, death and determinism with Russia’s war with Napoleon and its effects on those swept up by the terror it brings. The lives of Pierre, Prince Andrei and Natasha are changed forever as conflict rages throughout the early 19th century.

ali-bridges-of-madison-countyThe Bridges of Madison County by Robert James Waller

The story of Robert Kincaid, the photographer and free spirit searching for the covered bridges of Madison County, and Francesca Johnson, the farm wife waiting for the fulfillment of a girlhood dream, this story gives voice to the longings of men and women everywhere-and shows us what it is to love and be loved so intensely that life is never the same again.

ali-atonementAtonement by Ian McEwan

On a hot summer day in 1934, thirteen-year-old Briony Tallis witnesses a moment’s flirtation between her older sister, Cecilia, and Robbie Turner, the son of a servant and Cecilia’s childhood friend. But Briony’s incomplete grasp of adult motives—together with her precocious literary gifts—brings about a crime that will change all their lives. As it follows that crime’s repercussions through the chaos and carnage of World War II and into the close of the twentieth century, Atonement engages the reader on every conceivable level, with an ease and authority that mark it as a genuine masterpiece.

ali-love-in-the-time-of-choleraLove in the time of cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez

Florentino Ariza has never forgotten his first love. He has waited nearly a lifetime in silence since his beloved Fermina married another man. Following the death of her husband, Florentino has another chance to declare his eternal passion and win her back. Will love that has survived half a century remain unrequited?

 

 

 

 

 

Costa Book Of the Year – Days Without End by Sebastian Barry

Irish playwright and author Sebastian Barry is celebrating this week, having been presented with the Costa Book of the Year award for his latest novel Days Without End. Since being established in 1971, the Costa Awards have been one of the country’s most well-respected and prestigious literary prizes. Barry is the first person to be given the award twice, having previously won it in 2008 for his novel The Secret Scripture. Barry says that his son coming out as gay was a crucial factor in him writing the story, which is set in the 1850s and has a gay love story at its centre. In their citation, the judges called it “A miracle of a book – both epic and intimate – that manages to create spaces for safety in the noise and the chaos of history.” Days Without End – along with many of Barry’s other works – can be found on our extensive catalogue.

days-without-endThomas McNulty, aged barely seventeen and having fled the Great Famine in Ireland, signs up for the U.S. Army in the 1850s. With his brother in arms, John Cole, Thomas goes on to fight in the Indian Wars–against the Sioux and the Yurok–and, ultimately, the Civil War. Orphans of terrible hardships themselves, the men find these days to be vivid and alive, despite the horrors they see and are complicit in.
Moving from the plains of Wyoming to Tennessee, Sebastian Barry’s latest work is a masterpiece of atmosphere and language. An intensely poignant story of two men and the makeshift family they create with a young Sioux girl, Winona, Days Without End is a fresh and haunting portrait of the most fateful years in American history and is a novel never to be forgotten.

seb-barry-a-long-long-waySet at the onset of World War One, ‘A Long Long Way’ evokes the camaraderie and humour of Willie Dunne and his regiment, the Royal Dublin Fusiliers, but also the divided loyalties that many Irish soldiers felt. It also explores and dramatizes the events of the Easter Rising within Ireland.

seb-temporary-gentlemanJack McNulty is a temporary gentleman, an Irishman whose commission in the British army in the Second World War was never permanent. In 1957, sitting in his lodgings in Accra, he urgently sets out to write his story. He feels he cannot take one step further, or even hardly a breath, without looking back at all that has befallen him. He is an ordinary man, both petty and heroic, but he has seen extraordinary things. He has worked and wandered around the world – as a soldier, an engineer, a UN observer – trying to follow his childhood ambition to better himself.

The other shortlisted books – This Must Be the Place by Maggie O’Farrell, The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry and The Gustav Sonata by Rose Tremain are also available to borrow from Leeds Libraries.

Top 10 Science Fiction

Science Fiction is a genre that people either say they love or hate. It is a shame that many write it off as ‘not for them’ while often enjoying the films at the cinema that have been adapted from a book.

So if you fancy giving giving a new genre a chance these are the top 10 science fiction novels that were borrowed from us last month.

scifi-woolWool by Hugh Howey

In a ruined and hostile landscape, a community exists in a giant underground silo. Inside, men and women live an enclosed life full of rules and regulations, of secrets and lies. The people who don’t follow the rules are the dangerous ones; they dare to hope and dream, and infect others with their optimism. Their punishment is simple and deadly. They are allowed outside. Jules is one of these people. She may well be the last.

scifi-the-long-cosmosThe Long Cosmos by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter

2070-71. Nearly six decades after Step Day and in the Long Earth, the new Next post-human society continues to evolve. For Joshua Valiente, now in his late sixties, it is time to take one last solo journey into the High Meggers: an adventure that turns into a disaster. Alone and facing death, his only hope of salvation lies with a group of trolls. But as Joshua confronts his mortality, the Long Earth receives a signal from the stars. A signal that is picked up by radio astronomers but also in more abstract ways – by the trolls and by the Great Traversers. Its message is simple but ts implications are enormous: JOIN US. The super-smart Next realise that the Message contains instructions on how to develop an immense artificial intelligence but to build it they have to seek help from throughout the industrious worlds of mankind.

scifi-the-thing-itselfThe Thing Itself by Adam Roberts

Two men while away the days in an Antarctic research station. Tensions between them build as they argue over a love letter one of them has received. One is practical and open. The other surly, superior and obsessed with reading one book – by the philosopher Kant. As a storm brews and they lose contact with the outside world they debate Kant, reality and the emptiness of the universe. The come to hate each other – and they learn that they are not alone.

scifi-the-long-utopiaThe Long Utopia by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter

2045-2059. After the cataclysmic upheavals of Step Day and the Yellowstone eruption humanity is spreading further into the Long Earth, and society, on a battered Datum Earth and beyond, continues to evolve. Now an elderly and cantankerous AI, Lobsang lives in disguise with Agnes in an exotic, far-distant world. He’s convinced they’re leading a normal life in New Springfield – they even adopt a child – but it seems they have been guided there for a reason. As rumours of strange sightings and hauntings proliferate, it becomes clear that something is very awry with this particular world. Millions of steps away, Joshua is on a personal journey of discovery: learning about the father he never knew and a secret family history. But then he receives a summons from New Springfield. Lobsang understands the enormity of what’s taking place beneath the surface of his earth – a threat to all the worlds of the Long Earth.

scifi-auroraAurora by Kim Stanley Robinson

Our voyage from Earth began generations ago. Now, we approach our destination. A new home. Aurora.

scifi-fellowship-of-the-ringThe Fellowship of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien

The ‘Fellowship of the Ring’ is the first part of Tolkien’s epic adventure ‘The Lord of the Rings’. Frodo Baggins finds himself faced with an immense task, as his elderly cousin Bilbo entrusts the Ring to his care.

scifi-the-martianThe Martian by Andy Weir

I’m stranded on Mars. I have no way to communicate with Earth. I’m in a habitat designed to last 31 days. If the oxygenator breaks down, I’ll suffocate. If the water reclaimer breaks down, I’ll die of thirst. If the hab breaches, I’ll just kind of explode. If none of those things happen, I’ll eventually run out of food and starve to death. I’m screwed.

scifi-xeelee-enduranceXeelee Endurance by Stephen Baxter

Return to the eon-spanning and universe-crossing conflict between humanity and the unknowable alien Xeelee in this selection of uncollected and unpublished stories. From tales charting the earliest days of man’s adventure to the stars to stories of Old Earth, four billion years in the future, the range and startling imagination of Baxter is always on display. As humanity rises and falls, ebbs and flows, one thing is always needed – the ability to endure.

scifi-the-oceanThe Ocean at the end of the lane by Neil Gaiman

It began for our narrator 40 years ago when the family lodger stole their car and committed suicide in it, stirring up ancient powers best left undisturbed. Dark creatures from beyond the world are on the loose and it will take everything our narrator has just to stay alive.

scifi-the-explorerThe Explorer by James Smythe

When journalist Cormac Easton is selected to document the first manned mission into deep space, he dreams of securing his place in history as one of humanity’s great explorers. But in space, nothing goes according to plan. The crew wake from hypersleep to discover their captain dead in his allegedly fail-proof safety pod.