#LeedsReadsBookclub May/June – The Wife Between Us

The Wife Between Us

Our recommended read and this month’s book club book is The Wife Between Us by Greer Hendricks and Sarah Pekkanen. 

When you read this book, you will make many assumptions. It’s about a jealous wife, obsessed with her replacement. It’s about a younger woman set to marry the man she loves. The first wife seems like a disaster; her replacement is the perfect woman. You will assume you know the motives, the history, the anatomy of the relationships. You will be wrong.

Download the book via Borrowbox (by following this link or downloading the Borrowbox app onto your android or iOS device) in either eBook or eAudiobook format. Don’t worry about having to wait for the book – it can be read by lots of people at the same time, making it ideal for a book club book.

Below are some topics and questions for you to consider when reading the book. For this guide and more information on the book visit the authors website greerhendricks.com

  1. On page 7, Samantha asks Nellie one of the defining questions of the novel: “Ever think he’s too good to be true?” At what point did you start to think that Sam might be right, and Richard might actually be too good to be true?
  2. What do you think is the significance of Vanessa’s new job at an upscale clothing store? How might it affect her to still be in the upper class world she once occupied, but in a much different role? Compare and contrast her experience there to her previous job as a teacher.
  3. Throughout the novel, Aunt Charlotte and Vanessa have an extremely close relationship, even when Vanessa struggles to be honest with her aunt. How do you see this relationship affecting the choices Vanessa makes? Is there someone in your family with whom you have a similar bond?
  4. When did you realize who Vanessa, Nellie, and Emma actually are? How did this new understanding shape your experience of the rest of the story, and how do you think it will affect your experience if you reread the novel?
  5. On page 162, Vanessa says, “I guess I thought marrying Richard would erase my concerns. But my old anxieties simply yielded to new ones.” Do you think that that is a common misconception about entering into a marriage? If so, why do you think so many men and women believe this?
  6. The Wife Between Us asks difficult questions about how much someone’s past can explain or excuse their behavior. What’s your opinion? Did getting to know more about Vanessa’s or Richard’s backstory help to explain or justify their choices at all?
  7. The theme of sight – foresight, hindsight, and even real, physical eyesight – is wound throughout the entire novel. Maggie, the young sorority pledge, repeatedly says, “I hate it when I can’t see.” Do you think that anyone in this novel could (or should) have been able to see more clearly the consequences of their actions? Do you believe in the old saying, “Hindsight is 20/20?”
  8. Did the end of the novel leave you questioning who was really calling the shots and who had a full picture of what was going on? Which character do you think was truly orchestrating the events that were set into action – or was there more than one person responsible? Why do you believe this?

Join us to discuss this book on Twitter on Thursday 18th June at 5.30pm. Don’t forget to use #LeedsReadsBookclub in your tweets.

Fun Palaces at Leeds Libraries

Fun Palace logo

This year we are delighted to be hosting Fun Palaces in 7 of our libraries.

Fun Palaces is a movement campaigning for culture by, for and with all – with a firm belief that community belongs at the core of all culture – and an annual weekend of events, where arts, crafts, science, tech and digital are a catalyst for community engagement and full participation for everyone, from the grassroots up.

Fun Palaces are made by local people for their own communities, bringing together arts and sciences, crafts, tech and digital, free and fun, linked by the the Fun Palace network – Everyone an Artist, Everyone a Scientist. We welcome many more, from everywhere and anywhere, to join us in 2017 and beyond.

We want you to help us create a Fun Palace that is unique and relevant to the community that you live in. Have you got a skill that you can share with others? We would love you to give some time to share that skill at one of our Fun Palaces over the weekend of the 7th and 8th October. Follow the links below to find out more about the venue and contact details.

Community Hub and Library Fun Palaces in Leeds are in the following places:-

Armley One Stop Centre

Compton Centre

Crossgates Library

Dewsbury Road Community Hub

Guiseley Library

Horsforth Community Hub

Reginald Centre

For more information about Fun Palaces in general, visit the Fun Palace website.

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CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal shadowing

This blog is from Kat, an Assistant Community Librarian based in the East of the city.

Chatterbooks is a readers group for children aged 7-11, who meet on the first Thursday of the month at Chapel Allerton Library 3:30-4:30pm. The next session will be Thursday 4th July, and we will be discussing The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett and Return to the Secret Garden by Holly Webb – new members are always welcome!

This week we looked at some of the books shortlisted for the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal – a prize which recognises an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people. Here are the group’s thoughts on illustrations and some of their favourites from this year’s shortlist;

  • Illustrations can help younger readers understand the story.
  • Black and white illustrations give you some idea but still lets you use your imagination.
  • Sometimes, illustrations can distract you from the story, but can also support the story.

Kat A great big cuddleA Great Big Cuddle illustrated by Chris Riddell

  • AMAZING!
  • Chris Riddle’s books are always very detailed and makes us want to read another.
  • We always love Chris’s style of illustration, which is unique and peculiar.
  • One of our favourite pages was ‘Lost’ – the illustration mirrored the sadness of the poem exactly.

Kat Wild AnimalsWild Animals of the North by Dieter Braun

  • The style is unusual – simplistic but detailed and abstract.
  • This book is less cartoony and very beautiful – it reminds us more of pictures you would see in a gallery exhibition rather than a book.
  • Looks printed, or shapes stuck together at first, but on looking closer could possibly be done on a computer.

Kat The MarvelsThe Marvels by Brian Selznick

  • There is not as much text as you would expect in this book, the first half is completely illustrated – we wouldn’t imagine a book like this to have so many illutrations.
  • The illustrations give an impression of the story and are then followed by the text which gives more meaning to it.
  • Very traditional and realistic, the shading is very impressive!
  • The cover image makes some of us want to read the book – although it seems a bit dark and scary to others.

Kat TidyTidy by Emily Gravett

  • The illustrator has used a wide range of colours which gives the landscapes depth.
  • The trees are so beautiful – they make you think you are there.

Kat There is a tribeThere is a Tribe of Kids by Lane Smith

  • Although not realistic, the illustrations are very detailed.
  • Can tell that a variety of media has been used.
  • Not sure that they go with the story – there are hardly any words so without the illustrations there wouldn’t be much of a book.

Kat Harry potterHarry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone illustrated by Jim Kay

  • Would prefer to read this rather than a normal Harry Potter book
  • The illustrations tell the story very well, and they fit in perfectly with the words – can tell it has been planned very well.
  • Favourite pages shows Diagon Alley – very intricately detailed; looks like the films have come to life.
  • Can imagine this actually being real.

Our joint favourite books of the shortlist were A Great Big Cuddle, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and Wild Animals of the North. You can see the full shortlist and details of authors and illustrators here and the winner will be announced on 19th June.