CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal shadowing

This blog is from Kat, an Assistant Community Librarian based in the East of the city.

Chatterbooks is a readers group for children aged 7-11, who meet on the first Thursday of the month at Chapel Allerton Library 3:30-4:30pm. The next session will be Thursday 4th July, and we will be discussing The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett and Return to the Secret Garden by Holly Webb – new members are always welcome!

This week we looked at some of the books shortlisted for the CILIP Kate Greenaway Medal – a prize which recognises an outstanding book in terms of illustration for children and young people. Here are the group’s thoughts on illustrations and some of their favourites from this year’s shortlist;

  • Illustrations can help younger readers understand the story.
  • Black and white illustrations give you some idea but still lets you use your imagination.
  • Sometimes, illustrations can distract you from the story, but can also support the story.

Kat A great big cuddleA Great Big Cuddle illustrated by Chris Riddell

  • AMAZING!
  • Chris Riddle’s books are always very detailed and makes us want to read another.
  • We always love Chris’s style of illustration, which is unique and peculiar.
  • One of our favourite pages was ‘Lost’ – the illustration mirrored the sadness of the poem exactly.

Kat Wild AnimalsWild Animals of the North by Dieter Braun

  • The style is unusual – simplistic but detailed and abstract.
  • This book is less cartoony and very beautiful – it reminds us more of pictures you would see in a gallery exhibition rather than a book.
  • Looks printed, or shapes stuck together at first, but on looking closer could possibly be done on a computer.

Kat The MarvelsThe Marvels by Brian Selznick

  • There is not as much text as you would expect in this book, the first half is completely illustrated – we wouldn’t imagine a book like this to have so many illutrations.
  • The illustrations give an impression of the story and are then followed by the text which gives more meaning to it.
  • Very traditional and realistic, the shading is very impressive!
  • The cover image makes some of us want to read the book – although it seems a bit dark and scary to others.

Kat TidyTidy by Emily Gravett

  • The illustrator has used a wide range of colours which gives the landscapes depth.
  • The trees are so beautiful – they make you think you are there.

Kat There is a tribeThere is a Tribe of Kids by Lane Smith

  • Although not realistic, the illustrations are very detailed.
  • Can tell that a variety of media has been used.
  • Not sure that they go with the story – there are hardly any words so without the illustrations there wouldn’t be much of a book.

Kat Harry potterHarry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone illustrated by Jim Kay

  • Would prefer to read this rather than a normal Harry Potter book
  • The illustrations tell the story very well, and they fit in perfectly with the words – can tell it has been planned very well.
  • Favourite pages shows Diagon Alley – very intricately detailed; looks like the films have come to life.
  • Can imagine this actually being real.

Our joint favourite books of the shortlist were A Great Big Cuddle, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and Wild Animals of the North. You can see the full shortlist and details of authors and illustrators here and the winner will be announced on 19th June.

#whatsyourstory – Meet Kim

kim-woodFull-time mum Kim Wood moved to Leeds seven years ago. With her husband working long hours and a new baby to look after, Kim felt isolated in a new area where she hardly knew anyone. She loved using her local library in Newcastle when she was growing up, so when she moved to Leeds she quickly sought out her local library. It’s proved a real lifeline for her and her three daughters; Sophie, Chloe and Phoebe. The girls are total bookworms and they love nothing more than coming to the library to read and explore new books – and taking home armfuls to read! Kim loves the variety of events happening at her local library and the chance to meet other parents and have some grown-up conversations! From storytimes to tea parties to food festivals, there’s always something fun going on that she can bring the family to. Using her local library has really helped Kim feel part of the community.

You don’t just have to take our word for it, here’s Kim telling you her story in her own words: https://youtu.be/C6uja0arxvw

Now you’ve met another of our Leeds Libraries ambassadors, could you be the next? If one of the many services available at Leeds Libraries has helped you, we want to know. Tweet us or write on our Facebook page using the hashtag #whatsyourstory, or email us at whatsyourstory@leeds.gov.uk, and let us know how we’ve helped you.

Blue Monday

This blog post comes from Charlotte, our Digital Engagement Librarian.

The third Monday in January is now commonly known as Blue Monday – supposedly the most depressing day of the year. The concept was actually created by a travel company in 2005, using a calculation that took into account things like debt, weather and the amount of time since Christmas. However, this calculation has no basis in science and has been debunked many times!

charlotte-the-rest-of-usDespite this, Blue Monday seems to have caught the imagination of the media and looks to be a regular feature for Januarys to come. Even though today isn’t really the most depressing day of the year, it seems as good a day as any to highlight some books that will perk you up this winter!

charlotte-fragile-thingsThe Reading Agency’s Reading Well site is a great place to start. There are two categories of books, Books on Prescription and Mood-Boosting Books.

charlotte-the-worry-cureBooks on Prescription is a collection of books to help you manage and understand health and wellbeing using self-help reading. If you visit a GP or health professional, they may recommend one or more titles from the Books on Prescription list.

If you’re looking for an uplifting read, then head to the Mood-Boosting Books collection. There’s a range of fiction, non-fiction and poetry all recommended by readers and reading groups for their uplifting abilities.

charlotte-the-readers-of-broken-wheelAs well as making you feel a bit more cheerful, there’s also evidence that books can make you live longer! The report concludes that, “the benefits of reading books include a longer life in which to read them … The robustness of our findings suggests that reading books may not only introduce some interesting ideas and characters, it may also give more years of reading.”

 

Librarian’s (and family) Choice

This week’s blog is from Trudi (and her family), a Community Librarian based in the South of the city.

It’s almost Christmas and after all the festivities there may be time to relax and read. Looking for inspiration? Perhaps these will help…

Books for a Year Six child…

trudi-street-childStreet Child by Berlie Doherty
This is on a Year 6 reading list at a local primary school. The list also includes Goodnight Mr Tom and as most of the children had already read it, Street Child was the next most popular!
My youngest daughter is enjoying this immensely. The story is set in Victorian times and is about a boy called Jim, whose dad has died and his mum is going to die. There is no money and they are about to lose their home. A book about survival.

trudi-wimpy-kidDiary of a Wimpy Kid by Jeff Kinney
There are ten books in the Diary of a Wimpy Kid series.
The series started off online in 2004 and made its print debut in April of 2007. There are now more than 180 million copies of Diary of a Wimpy Kid books available in 61 editions and 52 languages.
A few children I know have asked for a set of these books for Christmas! Ever popular, written in a comic format with drawings and speech bubbles, my daughter cannot get enough of these. Funny and complete escapism.

I asked my husband which book he would recommend as a gift for someone. His answer was…

trudi-fellowship-of-the-ringLord of the Rings by J.R.R Tolkien
This is an epic adventure and renowned as a favourite for children and adults. My husband read it when he was aged 28 (almost 20 years ago) and loved being transported through lots of different lands and settings on a magical and fantastical grand adventure. He says that the books are much better than the films! If he could own only one book, this would be it.

And…

trudi-grapes-of-wrathGrapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
My husband read this recently and couldn’t stop talking about it.
With themes pertinent to society today, this is a journey with the Joad family who are evicted by greedy bankers recovering their farming properties in the American mid-west to sell to larger, more profitable farming companies. Their only hope is to travel to California to start a new life having been tempted by the misrepresentation of the land of opportunity. Everyone should read this!

My eldest daughter is almost out of her teens and her recommendations include:-

trudi-handmaids-taleThe Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
This book was lent to my daughter by a family friend and came highly recommended.
Written in 1985, this novel, in the genre of speculative fiction, is set in an oppressive imperfect world – where women exist to fulfil the desires of society but are chastised for it. A group of women are moved between wealthy men, to mother their children to keep the population stable. They are harshly judged by other women for this vital job. Although she found some of the themes terrifying, this book is very highly rated by my daughter as a ‘must read’.

trudi-the-girl-who-savedThe Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson
A poor girl from the slums of Soweto comes across a fortune and gets embroiled in a political secret. She is sent to Sweden where she meets a man who, in law, doesn’t exist. A completely bizarre and hilarious book. Another ‘must read’ from my daughter who was laughing so much trying to explain the storyline that it must just speak for itself!

What I will be reading over Christmas…

trudi-talking-headsTalking Heads by Alan Bennett
I first read this collection of monologues as soon as they were published in the late 1980s and realised quickly that although I was only in my teens, I had an old soul! Humorous and touching, all human life is here.
I love anything by Alan Bennett and look forward to reading Keeping On Keeping On!

trudi-a-million-yearsA Million Years In A Day by Greg Jenner
A good ‘dip in and out of’ book, this is a witty look at the popular history of everyday life and social rituals, from the Stone Age to the phone age, brought to you by the chief nerd of the Horrible Histories TV series.
If you secretly enjoy watching Horrible Histories then you will love this!

Librarian’s Choice – Ferret Books

Generally when I ask a librarian to recommend a selection of books for the blog, I know what sort of books that I might get. However this list has come from total leftfield. These books are compiled by Montse, an Assistant Community Librarian based in the East of the city. I hope it is useful for anyone who is, or wants to be a ferret lover!

Dogs, cats, rabbits and hamsters are 4 of the most usual pets people have at home. Fish, reptiles and birds come next; you’ll find ferrets towards the end of the list. You may have seen ferrets racing through pipes at country and game fairs, or biting Richard Whiteley on telly back on 1977 (if you are not just a nipper).

Maybe you know someone who keeps ferrets or perhaps you may be thinking of getting one or two yourself? Whichever the case you’ll find many a book in the library to furnish you with knowledge and tell you all about how to look after, care, train and enjoy playing or even hunt with ferrets. Here are a few I’ve borrowed myself. I keep my friend’s 3 jill at home on a “part-time” basis and I’ve learned lots by reading these books.

Montse Ferrets McKimmeyFerrets by Vickie McKimmey

Ferrets are lively, domestic pets that can provide great entertainment and companionship. In this book you can find out how to prepare your house for adopting a ferret, as well as essential care information to ensure he is healthy and happy. It has about 100 pages of information from pet care and animal experts—with a family-friendly design, over 60 full-colour photographs, and helpful tip boxes. It comes also with advice on feeding, housing, grooming, training, health care, and fun activities.

Montse Ferrets RickardFerrets: Care and Breeding by Ian C. Rickard

The author is an experienced ferret owner and breeder and he provides the reader with lots of info about all aspects of the ferret’s care and management. It looks at the history, origins, and scientific classification of ferrets; their anatomy and physiology; handling and housing; breeding and rearing; feeding and nutritional requirements; colour-breeding genetics and colour standards for showing; and health and welfare. This is a very useful book if you’re thinking of not just keeping but breeding ferrets.

Montse Ferret SchillingFerrets for Dummies by Kim Schilling

Like any other “for dummies” book here you’ve got THE ultimate reference to all aspects of keeping a ferret. Almost 400 pages – I still haven’t finished reading my own copy – of information organised by chapters so you can go directly to the topic you need. So there’s extra info on things like diets, teeth, diseases, housing, games, vets, etc. etc. The only downside is that it’s not as colourful and hasn’t got as many illustrations as other books.

Monste Ferret BuckleHalf my Facebook friends are ferrets by J.A. Buckle

Ok, so this is not a reference book but Teenage Fiction, but you learn one or two things about ferrets when you read about Josh’s life in his diary and his struggle to achieve some goals before he’s 16. When I picked this book I thought he was going to have lots of ferrets (by looking at the title) but he only has one, Ozzy, who bites and escapes of its cage all the time. Easy read, very funny and realistic; many subjects other than ferrets are included in this book like being popular, becoming a rock star, girlfriends, life at home when you are a teen, etc. totally recommended if you want a good laugh.

Montse Ferret WhiteheadFerreting: An Essential Guide by Simon Whitehead

Here’s a really good book by a professional ferreter with lots of information about how to catch rabbits using ferrets and nets. He gives good advice on looking after the ferrets, transport, collars and finder units, working together with dogs, nets and digging, and the like; but also you’ll learn about rabbits, their habits, feeding, and behaviour. You may not need this book if you just want to keep ferrets as pets, but it will be appreciated by those with and interest in country pursuits.

Monste Ferret WellsteadThe Ferret and Ferreting guide by Graham Wellstead

I liked this book very much because it gives clear and useful information about ferrets in all main aspects and it’s a good guide to read when you are a beginner. Advice is given on selecting ferrets, their care, feeding and housing, and how to breed from them. It has some funny anecdotes by the author and  his experiences on training ferrets to hunt; the techniques and use of equipment is fully described and there is a guide to the legal aspects of hunting. Distinguishing coat colours in B&W photos was a bit tricky, though.

Montse Ferret BuckleStudies in the art of rat-catching by H.C. Barkley

This is a very special and old book, published in 1896, and you will only find it in the Information and Research department of the Central Library. It’s reference only, so no taking home allowed. Despite the book’s title, as much of the content is devoted to ferrets and rabbit control as it is to rat catching. It details such varied subjects as Ratting Tools, Learning Dog Language, Rabbit Catching, Long Netting, Ratting Dogs etc. This excellent title is recommended for all true countrymen. Many of the earliest sporting books, particularly those dating back to the 1800s, are now extremely scarce and very expensive, so having a read of this book for free makes you feel part of a lucky elite.

Montse Ferret ColsonFerret (the pet to get) by Rob Colson

This is a good reference book for children; aimed at 9+ year olds, it gives easy to understand information and advice about what entitles to have a ferret as a pet. This book is a good read is you need to decide whether a ferret (or ferrets) would be a suitable pet for you and your children. It tells about character and behaviour, good and bad habits, how to look after them, etc. It also has a section about polecats and hunting with ferrets. With 32 pages this book is not too long to bore and has lovely photos.

Montse Ferret McNicholasFerrets (keeping ‘unusual’ pets) by June McNicholas

This is another really good book for children as introduction to ferrets. It explains the good points and not-so-good points about keeping ferrets and how to become the carer of healthy animals. Find out about the basic requirements, such as housing, food, water and exercise, and how to provide companionship for your ferrets. It contains information on the natural behaviour of ferrets, expert advice and tips on how to be a good ferret carer and a glossary of difficult and unusual terms.

Montse Ferret FrainThe Pet Ferret Handbook by Seán Frain

I haven’t read this book myself but the synopsis given online sounds quite good: “specifically designed for keepers of domestic ferrets in homes and apartments, this book covers the history of the ferret, how to choose the right pet, housing, feeding, house training, hygiene, exercise, breeding and even exhibiting.” The author is a well-known Patterdale terrier breeder from Cumbria, who has written lots of books on related subjects. It will definitely go onto my “To Read” list.

#whatsyourstory – Meet Jean

Jean image (2).jpgLast week we shared with you details of Bill Hyland’s great invention and this week’s post tells you all about another Leeds Libraries ambassador – Jean Murgatroyd.

Grandmother Jean Murgatroyd, from Armley, wanted to expand her social circle. So she joined the ‘knit-and-natter’ group that meets at her local library. She went on to learn how to knit and every week, Jean and her friends spend a happy afternoon knitting, chatting and relaxing over a cup of tea and a biscuit (or two). Although Jean admits she gets her stitches back-to-front sometimes, it’s a highlight of her week – and she’s always got a homemade gift for her beloved grandchildren. Whilst her husband has been poorly, Jean finds the library a great place to ‘be around friends’ as it takes her mind off things and she always feels welcome.

Now you’ve met two more of our Leeds Libraries ambassadors, could you be the next? If one of the many services available at Leeds Libraries has helped you, we want to know. Tweet us or write on our Facebook page using the hashtag #whatsyourstory, or email us at whatsyourstory@leeds.gov.uk, and let us know how we’ve helped you.

Leeds Libraries – New Non-Fiction this week

Here is a selection of the new non-fiction titles that will be arriving this week.

Life below stairsLife below stairs: in the Victorian & Edwardian country house by Sian Evans

From the cook, butler and housekeeper to the footman, lady’s maid and nanny, this is a glimpse behind the scenes of some of Britain’s grandest houses.

 

 

 

Eat yourself beautifulEat yourself beautiful: true beauty, from the inside out by Rosanna Davison

Combining cutting-edge nutritional science, wholesome vegan recipes and practical advice for making the most of a hectic daily routine, ‘Eat Yourself Beautiful’ is a functional and accessible guide to promoting beauty through nutritional wellbeing and the adoption of a balanced lifestyle.

How to knitHow to knit: go from beginner to expert with 20 new projects by Mollie Makes

Knitting may seem complicated, but in fact there are just two stitches you need to learn. Once you have mastered knit and purl, you can knit pretty much anything. The beginner’s section starts with a run-through of the basic tools and equipment you’ll need, as well as a handy guide to choosing yarn. Once you’re ready to start, learn the best way to hold your needles, and tackle the different cast-on methods to work out which works best for you. Once you’ve cast on, you are ready to make those all-important first stitches and choose your first project.

deep southDeep South: four seasons on back roads by Paul Theroux

For the past 50 years, Paul Theroux has travelled to the far corners of the earth – to China, India, Africa, the Pacific Islands, South America, Russia, and elsewhere – and brought them to life in his cool, exacting prose. In ‘Deep South’ he turns his gaze to a region much closer to his home. Travelling through North and South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama and Arkansas he writes of the stunning landscapes he discovers – the deserts, the mountains, the Mississippi – and above all, the lives of the people he meets.

Queen ElizabethQueen Elizabeth II and the Royal Family

 ‘Queen Elizabeth II and the Royal Family’ is a visual guide to the Queen, from her childhood to today. Telling the story of the House of Windsor, including events such as the royal wedding of Prince William and Kate Middleton, and profiles on key people such as Princess Diana and Prince Harry, right up to the birth of William and Kate’s second child, this is the complete guide to the world’s most famous royal family.

Maggie SmithMaggie Smith: a biography by Michael Coveney

No one does glamour, severity, girlish charm or tight-lipped witticism better than Dame Maggie Smith, one of Britain’s best-loved actors. This biography shines the stage-lights on the life and work of a truly remarkable performer, one whose career spans six decades.