Librarian’s Choice: Recommended reads for LGBT History Month

PrintThis blog comes from Alex, a library assistant on our peripatetic team.

Love is in the air… — yes, but so is hail and frost you might say. Fair point, it is after all February and, let’s face it, the weather is what it is. But suppose for a moment, we could travel anywhere we’d like to without queuing at the airport or drying our accounts out. Imagine we could do that whiles being wrapped up in a woolly blanket, enjoying a deliciously warm hot chocolate. Now suppose that I’m not just daydreaming; after all there is one wonderful thing we can all do for each other this February. Let’s take advice from our wise Scandinavian cousins: let’s all get hygge and let the romance of these stories warm our hearts because, is there any more magical way to travel than through the pages of a gripping book?

Inspired by LGBT* History Month 2017, I have chosen some of the most heart breaking love stories to get us all through February.

Picture books:

alex-tango-makes-threeAnd Tango Makes Three by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, illustrated by Henry Cole.

For all the animal lovers out there, there is probably no better love story than the one between Roy and Silo. Two penguins at New York Central Park Zoo, Roy and Silo might appear as an odd couple. Whiles their fellow penguins are preparing themselves for the joy and challenges of parenthood, Roy and Silo are worried they might never be able to become dads… or will they? There is only one way to find out.

Teenage Fiction:

alex-you-know-me-wellYou know me well by Nina LaCour & David Levithan

Friends at first sight, Mark and Kate have never spoken to each other until one fateful night their lives collide: Kate is running away from a chance of meeting the girl she has loved from afar, while Mark is in love with his best friend who may or may not loves him back. They are both lost and finding each other is the last thing on their minds., though they don’t realize just how important they will become to each other.

alex-fans-of-teh-impossible-lifeFans of the impossible life by Kate Scelsa

“May we live impossibly.” Sebby said when he opened his eyes. “Against all odds. May people look at us and wonder how such jewels can sparkle in the sad desert of the world. May we live the impossible life”.
Echoing Stephen Chbosky’s much celebrated novel “The perks of being a wallflower”, “Fans of the impossible life” is the story of love, loss, growing up and finding friends who can see through you and the person you’re trying to become. The story follows Sebby and his best friend Mira on their impromptu road trips and magical rituals designed to fix parts of their broken lives. But what will happen when Jeremy, the painfully shy and isolated art nerd, enters the picture?

alex-outOut by Joanna Kenrick, illustrated by Julia Page

This dyslexia friendly book is a short but gripping story of love, friendship and solidarity. “Out” poignantly portrays the difficult experience of ‘‘coming out’ and the struggle with unrequited love.

Teenage non-fiction:

alex-beyond-magentaBeyond Magenta: transgender teens speak out

Author and photographer Susan Kuklin meets and interviews six transgender and gender-neutral teens to portray them before, during, and after their personal acknowledgment of gender identity, empathetically exploring their emotional and physical transitioning.

 

Adult fiction:

alex-oranges-are-notOranges are not the only fruit by Jeanette Winterson

If you grew up gay among religious fundamentalists, Jeanette Winterson feels your pain. Oranges, the novelist and critic’s 1985 autobiographical debut novel, follows an English lesbian girl coming of age in a Pentecostal community.

alex-carolCarol by Patricia Highsmith

“And she did not have to ask if this was right, no one had to tell her, because this could not have been more right or perfect.” Previously published as “The Price of Salt”, most of us are probably familiar with Todd Haynes 2015 rendering of Patricia Highsmith’s lesbian novel. In Carol, two women from different backgrounds—one a department store clerk who dreams of a better life, the other a wealthy wife — strike up a passionate love affair with each other in 1950s New York.

alex-rubyfruit-jungleRubyfruit Jungle by Rita Mae Brown

Widely considered to be the lesbian coming of age novel par excellence, “Rubyfruit Jungle” follows the life of Molly Bolt, adopted daughter of a poor US family, who possesses remarkable beauty and who is aware of her lesbianism from early childhood. Sex, love and betrayal are at the heart of this turbulent coming to age, which often mirrors Brown’s own experience of being an emerging lesbian author in 1970s New York.

alex-orlandoOrlando: a Biography by Virginia Woolf.

“I’m sick to death of this particular self. I want another.” For the classics lovers amongst us, there is perhaps no book which better portrays the elusive essence of gender like Virginia Woolf’s “Orlando”. Spanning a lifetime of almost three centuries, Orland accompanies us on a poetic journey of rediscovery which challenges conventional assumptions of gender as a binary concept.

 

Adult non-fiction:

alex-queerQueer: a graphic history by Meg John Barker, illustrated by Julia Scheele (eBook)

Activist-academic Meg John Barker and cartoonist Julia Scheele illuminate the histories of queer thought and LGBTQ* action in this ground breaking non-fiction graphic novel. You can download the eBook from our library catalogues.

Gay life and culture: a world history by Robert Aldrich

In the years since Stonewall, the world has witnessed an outpouring of research, critical inquiry, and re-interpretation of gay life and culture. This book draws on ground breaking new material to present a comprehensive survey of all things gay, stretching back to ancient history and ranging to the present days. Critically acclaimed historian Robert Aldrich with the support of ten leading scholars juxtaposes thought-provoking essays with an extensive selection of images, many never before seen. This masterful combination reveals the story behind gay culture from the industrialized world to the remotest corners of tribal New Guinea.

alex-art-and-queer-cultureArt and queer culture by Catherine Lord and Richard Meyer

A comprehensive survey covering 125 years of art that has constructed, contested or otherwise responded to alternative forms of sexuality. The book traces the rich visual legacy of art’s relationship to queer culture, from the emergence of homosexuality as an identity in the late nineteenth century to the pioneering ‘genderqueers’ of the early twenty-first century.

 

For comic book lovers:

alex-prideThe Pride by Joe Glass and Mike Stock

Have you ever been sick of being misrepresented? Of having no one like you to look up to? Have you ever wanted to change everything?
Then you need to join FabMan, Wolf, Muscle Mary, Frost, Twink, Bear, Angel and White Trash on their mission to help people and improve LGBT representation. Wanting to fight for change, FabMan has formed PRIDE, the world’s premier LGBTQ supergroup. Not exactly receiving the desired response, the group faces opposition from the confrontational Justice Division and the nefarious Reverend. After a serious trial by fire, the team find themselves the only super team in the world capable of stopping The Reverend’s diabolical plot for world domination.

alex-juicy-motherJuicy mother: celebration by Jennifer Camper

Featuring work by and about queers, women and black artists, “Juicy Mother” is probably the queerest cartoon anthology you can get your hands on; these stories are not just exuberant and carefree, they are also a marvellous celebration of artistry and diversity.

 

alex-100-crushes100 crushes by Lim Elisha

100 Crushes compiles five years of queer comics by Elisha Lim, including excerpts from Sissy, The Illustrated Gentleman, Queer Child in the Eighties, and their cult series 100 Butches, as well as new work. It’s an absorbing documentary that travels through Toronto, Berlin, Singapore, and beyond in the form of interviews, memoirs, and gossip from an international queer vanguard.

Where there are books there is hope

dying matters logoWe are happy to support the Dying Matters campaign as we realise that death is an important subject even if it is not easy to talk about. Their mission is to help people talk more openly about dying, death and bereavement, and to make plans for the end of life. This book list is designed to help stimulate discussion and is only a sample of what is available in Leeds Libraries. The aim is to help people not only celebrate living but be empowered and informed as they face the end of life .

These books offer an opportunity to engage in this taboo subject, to learn and find solace in other people’s experiences as well as helping to find the answers to questions you never dared ask lastly ,to share ones last wishes with friends and family.

A Death Café will be running bi-monthly at The Reginald Centre Community Hub, Chapeltown in partnership with Xina Broderick, a local funeral Director, starting on Saturday 21st of January. Further details can be found here.

angie-death-mattersDeath Matters By Sally Petch

An unusual new book that encourages us to change how we think about dying. Throughout the book, author Sally Petch asks us to start talking about and planning our own death – so that we can reach a place of acceptance and lessen our fear of an event which is ultimately inevitable. “Death Matters is an easy to read book. Sally Petch has performed us a great service in helping us come to terms with the idea of death.” Satish Kumar, Editor-in-chief, Resurgence Magazine

angie-the-welcome-visitorThe Welcome Visitor by John Humphrys

Death is a subject modern society shies away from. But if we regard death as a failure in our desire to prolong life, can we ever arrive at a humane approach to those whose lives have lost meaning? Here, John Humphrys and his co-author Dr Sarah Jarvis take a wider look at how our attitudes to death have changed as doctors have learned how to prolong life beyond anything that could have been imagined only a few generations ago, and confront one of the great challenges facing the western world today. There are no easy answers but the first step must surely be to accept that death can be as welcome as it is inevitable.

angie-being-mortalBeing mortal: illness, medicine and what matters in the end by Atul Gawande

Atul Gawande examines his experiences as a surgeon, as he confronts the realities of ageing and dying in his patients and in his family, as well as the limits of what he can do. He emerges with a story that explores a range of questions.

angie-deaths-summer-coatDeath’s summer coat: what the history of death and dying can tell us about life and living by Brandy Shillace

Consideration of death and dying is back in the public forum. People are sipping tea at Death Cafes. Poses the question how can we approach death in a culture dead set against talking about mortality? Written with humour and humanity

angie-mums-listMum’s List by St John Greene

On her deathbed, Kate Greene’s only concern was for her two little boys, Reef and Finn, and her loving husband, Singe. She knew she’d be leaving them behind very soon. The couple talked and cried together as she wrote her thoughts and wishes down, trying to help the man she loved create the best life for their boys after she was gone

How to have a good death: Foreword By Esther Ranzen who shares her personal experience of losing her late husband Desmond Wilcox

Find out how to deal with death, from understanding the process of dying to communicating with hospital staff and working through difficult stages of bereavement. A book that helps you prepare and plan for a good death, with informed choices and practical advice.

angie-wills-and-probateWills and Probate by David Bunn

This two-in-one guide to making a will and obtaining probate for the estate of someone who has died could help readers save thousands of pounds on legal fees. The guide covers the whole of the U.K.

angie-good-funeral-guideThe Good Funeral Guide by Charles Cowling

A good death contributes to a good life, so we owe it to ourselves and our loved ones to deal with a reality most of us don’t want to face. Find out how to deal with death, from understanding the process of dying to communicating with hospital staff and working through the difficult stages of bereavement

angie-poems-for-funeralsPoems and readings for funerals and memorials Edited by Julia Watson

This book gathers together many of the treasured and poignant poems, readings, quotations and religious extracts that both celebrate life and express grief and sorrow about death,

angie-smoke-gets-inSmoke Gets In Your Eyes by Caitlin Doughty

Doughty – a twenty-something with a degree in medieval history and a flair for the macabre – took a job at a crematory, turning morbid curiosity into her life’s work. Thrown into a profession of gallows humour and vivid characters (both living and very dead), Caitlin learned to navigate the secretive culture of those who care for the deceased. This book tells an unusual coming-of-age story full of bizarre encounters and unforgettable scenes

angie-standing-on-myStanding on my brother’s shoulders: Making peace with grief and suicide by Tara J. Lal

Following the death of their mother during childhood Tara and her older brother Adam developed a deep, caring bond, but Adam struggled silently with growing anxiety and depression. Four years after their mother’s death, he committed suicide, throwing himself from his study window at Oxford University. Grief and insecurity threatened to engulf Tara, but eventually she found, within her brother’s Grief and insecurity threatened to engulf Tara, but eventually she found, within her brother’s diaries, her reason to live.

angie-what-does-dead-meanWhat does dead mean? a book for young children to help explain death and dying by Caroline Jay

This is an illustrated book that guides children gently through the ‘big’ questions they often ask about death and dying. Suitable for children aged 4+. This is an ideal book for parents and carers to read with their children, as well as teachers, therapists and counsellors working with young children.

Always and Forever by Debi Gliori

When Fox dies the rest of his family are absolutely distraught. How will Mole, Otter and Hare go on without their beloved friend? But, months later, Squirrel reminds them all of how funny Fox used to be, and they realise that Fox is still there in their hearts and memories.

angie-are-you-sadAre You Sad, Little Bear? by Rachel Rivett and Tina MacNaughton

A book about learning to say goodbye. This charmingly illustrated picture book will help young children in times of bereavement, loss or change, gently exploring the reasons for saying goodbye and giving reassurance that goodbye doesn’t mean the end of things.

angie-grandads-islandGrandad’s Island by Benji Davies

After the phenomenal success of The Storm Whale and On Sudden Hill, this new book by Benji Davies deals with the emotional topic of losing a grandparent. Subtly told, this beautifully illustrated book tackles a difficult subject with great sensitivity and depth.

angie-fault-in-our-starsThe fault in our stars by John Green

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten.

angie-tuesdays-with-morrieTuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Alborn

Maybe it was a grandparent, or a teacher or a colleague. Someone older, patient and wise, who understood you when you were young and gave you sound advice to help you make your way through life. For Mitch Albom, that person was Morrie Schwartz, his college professor from nearly twenty years ago. Mitch Albom rediscovered Morrie in the last months of the older man’s life. Knowing he was dying of motor neurone disease – MItch visited Morrie in his study every Tuesday, just as they used to back in college. Their rekindled relationship turned into one final ‘class’: lessons in how to live.

Precious Lives by Margaret Forster

Margaret Forster’s most personal biography yet. It takes up the intertwining story of her gritty, 96 year old northern father, Arthur with that of her sister-in-law, Marion, who dies of Cancer. Margaret Forster’s father was not a man to answer questions about life and death, so she attempts to answer them for herself. As Forster looks back at Arthur’s life an indomitable man, she evokes incidents from her childhood, his working life and stubborn old age, trying to make sense of their largely unspoken relationship and of his tenacious hold on life, and on his family. Arthur and Marion’s lives were ordinary, but, when faced with death become precious.

UNESCO’s World Falconry Day

This year sees the 4th anniversary of World Falconry Day, in recognition of Falconry by the UNESCO as Intangible Cultural Heritage, celebrating with the theme Recovery of the Peregrine Falcon.

By Falconry we understand the hunting tradition defined as taking quarry in its natural state and habitat by means of trained birds of prey. Preserving falconry involves maintaining not only the traditional culture that builds practical skills of empathy with animals, but also the conservation of raptors and their prey through preservation of natural habitats. Therefore falconry is encouraged within the context of sustainable use of wildlife.

Here I’ve selected a dozen of books available from Leeds Libraries on the topic:

montse-falcon-kesA Kestrel For A Knave – Barry Hines

Everybody has heard of this book or seen the film by Ken Loach “Kes”, which is based on it. A working class boy troubled at home and school snatches a kestrel chick from its nest (totally illegal nowadays) and trains it to fly with him with the help from a book he steals from his local library (tut tut). It is pretty much a classic that highlights the life hardships of a boy in the 60’s in South Yorkshire. Even though kestrels are falcons they are not used much in falconry as a way to bring meat to the table because you’d be feeding yourself on mice, voles and the such, which are the typical quarry.

montse-falcon-trainingTraining Birds of Prey – Jemima Parry-Jones

Jemima Parry-Jones is one of the best known names in the falconry circles. She is the director of the International Centre for Birds of Prey, Newent, which I recommend you visit if you get a chance. Following in her father’s (Phillip Glasier) steps, she has written several books about falconry and become a world-renowned falconer and conservationist. This is the book to read for those with an interest in taking up falconry; it covers all aspects in training your hawk from even before you buy it, and it’s an eye-opener for those who think of them as pets, dispelling any similarities with Harry Potter.

Fledgling days – Emma Ford

As well as Jemima, Emma Ford is another world acclaimed female falconer, who has also written several books on falconry. Together with husband Steve, they opened the British School of Falconry at Gleneagles hotel in Scotland. In this book Emma tells us of her first encounters and fascination with birds of prey when she was just a young girl aged 8 and how she went on to train and look after birds and other animals, teach falconry, work for TV and films and even the Emir of Abu Dhabi, Seikh Zayed. An inspirational biographical read for anyone with a love of animals.

monste-falcon-historicHistorical Falconry – Helen Rowlands

This is a superb illustrated guide to the history of falconry from its beginnings to present times with regards to attire, training methods, evolution of chosen species, etc., how falconry became popular and fashionable and how it declined with the advance of firearms. The book explores falconry both as an art and as a hunting method, including techniques and skills and how it’s always been part of the cultural heritage of the country where practised. Not so much about modern falconry but more focused on its historical aspect.

monste-falcon-no-wayNo Way But Gentlenesse – Richard Hines

I haven’t read this book yet but it’s in my “to read” list. Richard Hines is brother to Barry, who wrote the first book in this list. The main character Billy Casper is based on Richard, he found the kestrel and trained it, and A Kestrel for a Knave is pretty much his biography written by his brother. Aaaah, I hear you say. Yes, I was surprised as well when I found out this.

montse-falcon-h-is-forH is for Hawk – Helen MacDonald

This is an autobiographical account of how the author, an experienced falconer, went to train a goshawk, Mabel, to cope with the sadness and bereavement after her father died. For those who don’t know, goshawks are notorious for their nervousness and killing instinct and can be quite a handful to train compared with other bird of prey species. Helen grudgingly decides to re-read The Goshawk, by T.H. White, as she trains Mabel and exposes the differences in technique between themselves. The story tells us of the bonding between human and bird, both predators with a wild side.

montse-falcon-goshawkThe Goshawk – T. H. White

You can borrow this book from the library but personally is one of those books I don’t want to read because it’s going to make me cross and angry. Mr White wasn’t a falconer as such but an eccentric character with an obsession for “belonging” in a society he didn’t really fit in. Thus, he goes to train birds of prey without knowing what he’s doing and sadly killing them in the process. His lack of skills and experience added to the ancient and superseded books he uses as reference translate as cruelty to the bird. Perhaps I should do as Helen and one day, grudgingly read it.

Of Falconry (Book III of The Ornithology) – Francis Willughby of Middleton in the county of Warwick Esq.          REFERENCE ONLY

This jewel is only available from the Information and Research department of Central Library, so you won’t be able to take it home. However, it’s worth spending some time in the library marvelling at this book from 1678!! The book is divided into books, sections and chapters and the last book is about falconry, wherein the 2 main parts are “reclaiming and managing hawks” and “diseases of hawks, prevention, signs and cures”. It also includes over 100 pages of illustrations of the birds he talks about throughout. A truly interesting read all in all.

montse-falcon-eaglesEagle & Birds of Prey – Jemima Parry-Jones

Even though this book is classed as Junior, the information within is apt for adults as well. It deals with hawks, falcons, eagles, vultures and owls covering all aspects from anatomy, reproduction, hunting techniques, types of quarry, and extinction of species, especially vultures, of which Jemima is a stalwart conservationist. Raptor weekend at her centre on 2nd and 3rd Sept 2017 – not to be missed.

All British Eagle – Captain Charles Knight

This is a 1943 memoir of the war-time adventures of Charles William Robert Knight with his famous golden eagle Mr Ramshaw. Captain Knight was a great British falconer, writer, lecturer, photographer, explorer and film director. His travels with the eagle are well recorded in his own books and films (I Know Where I’m Going). He is uncle of Phillip Glasier, who is Jemima’s father. Falconry runs in the family.

montse-falcon-falconFalcon – Helen MacDonald

Another book by Helen MacDonald and previous to H is for Hawk. Here we learn all about falcons from all aspects other than just the obvious naturalist ones. She covers history, culture and folkloric meanings, conservation and use in falconry; but also how falcons have been used in war and by NASA and even publicity campaigns. This is a truly enjoyable read for everyone with an interest in nature and birds of prey. Lots of illustrations accompany this cultural analysis of falcon-human relationship.

montse-falcon-peregrinePeregrine Falcon – Patrick Stirling-Aird

Last but not least, this book comes with dozens of amazing photos of falcons in colour and close-up detail, but also it’s full of information about different aspects of the bird including biology, behaviour, reproduction and hunting. It tells the gripping story of how peregrines were rescued from the brink of extinction and inhabit our cities. Well written and easy to read.

 

Blog Post by Montse, an Assistant Community Librarian based in the east of the city.

Librarian’s Choice: Reduce, Recycle, Re-love

I have been an ardent collector of curios and the second hand for many years. My main thrill is to rummage and forage through other people’s trash to find an item I can refashion and treasure. I am not ashamed to call myself a skip surfer, car boot obsessive and charity shop aficionado.

What started as a means of buying cheap second hand clothes and furnishings as a student became a lifelong obsession with all things old and vintage.  Old and abandoned objects have a story to tell, they connect us to the past, and I am naturally drawn to the nostalgia and style of bygone times.

In this disposable and consumeristic world where ‘old’ is considered antiquated and unfashionable I see an opportunity to breathe new life into things which deserve a second chance. Once restored or up-cycled I have the privilege of owning something that is often unique and  well – crafted  whilst having all the pleasure and satisfaction of having added my own creative flourishes.

Over the years Leeds Libraries have been an amazing resource for books on art and design , interiors and crafts, all of which excite and inspire me. More recently there has seen a blossoming of publications on upcycling. Below I have listed some of my recommendations. Some of the projects I have undertaken at home to good effect, others are on my ‘to do list’ when I can find the time. Some of the books just beckon to be borrowed as the pictures alone are enchanting. You need not be an expert crafter or sewer; all of the projects have easy to follow instructions. and require very few tools. it’s amazing what you can do with a staple gun alone.

I hope you feel inspired to give it a go. Enjoy!

angie-thrifty-chicThrifty chic: interior style on a shoestring by Liz Bauwens

‘Thrifty Chic’ shows you how to revive and revamp to create an eclectic and unique interior style on a shoestring. I particularly like the idea of a striped hand painted staircase. Best to use a quick dry paint for this one and wait till the kids and the dogs are out of the house.

angie-junk-geniusJunk genius: stylish ways to repurpose everyday objects, with over 80 projects and ideas by Juliette Goggin

In this book you’ll find rewarding and money-saving recycling projects. My favourites include lighting made out of old kitchenaliia. It also contains a great chapter on creating jewellery out of old jigsaw pieces, thimbles, typewriter keys and watch faces. A must have ‘book to borrow’ for any Steam Punk fans out there.

angie-repurposed-libraryThe repurposed library by Lisa Occhipinti

A celebration of the possibilities that books have to offer as an art material. This book takes my passion for books one step further, It includes 33 projects to make out of books, my favourites are: a lettered wreath, a literary lampshade; and a book ledge made from beautiful old hardbacks.

angie-reviveRevive!: inspired interiors from recycled materials by Jacqueline Mulvaney

This is the only book where more advanced sewing skills than my own are required. This would suit an intermediate or confident sewer. Whilst I have tackled some basic upholstery in the past I haven’t quite mastered some of the more advanced features of my sewing machine. However, I do have a growing collection of fabrics which are in need of refashioning and embellishing. This book shows you how to make and decorate throws, cushions, curtains and blinds. The Inspiration Board featured is an art piece in itself.

angie-vintageCreating the vintage look: 35 ways to upcycle for a stylish home by Ellie Laycock

This book offers you simple step by step guidance to create unique homewares. It makes you to look at unloved items in a totally new way, and encourages you to think before you throw.
It is a good starting point for anyone new to up-cycling . It is the answer to all your birthday and Christmas conundrums, as from now on you can just DIY it. My favourites are the stamp collection placemats ( I have done this myself with great success ), the cheese grater pen pot, the tea set bird feeders and the dish towel curtain to name just a few…..

angie-recycled-homeRecycled home: transform your home using salvaged materials by Rebecca Proctor

This book features 50 stylish craft projects using salvaged materials, with step-by-step illustrations to guide you through to completion . No special skills are needed.
My favourites include the cosy hot water bottle cover and patchwork book wallpaper. The rag rug bath mat is an on-going project I have yet to complete at home. My main advice to aspiring be rag ruggers is firstly just Do It! Basic rag rugging is really so simple and can even be done in front of the T.V. It is an ideal hobby for all finger twitchers, nail biters and smokers will miraculously cease as they become totally immersed. Alternatively, use it as part of a regular meditative practice whilst listening to music or an absorbing audio book. A tip for free is to start small don’t be overly ambitious in size or scale as in my case it will take forever to finish.

angie-flea-market-chicFlea market chic: the thrifty way to create a stylish home by Liz Bauwens

This book is on my Christmas Wish List, it is crammed full of eclectic interiors which mix the old and new to create a totally unique look. I am particular drawn to the shed and cabins section as my long term ambition is to make the ultimate downsize and move into one!

‘Flea Market Chic’ will show you how to spot the clever find in a pile of junk, where to look and how to negotiate. Sourcing materials need not be expensive or difficult, if you ask around. start with family and friends, use recycling sites such as Freecycle or use the Freeads on Gumtree; Visit your local scrap store whether that be Scrap Shed in Leeds or the Cone Exchange in Harrogate. Start using your local charity shops, for a few pence you are supporting the developing world or helping good causes nearer to home. Even better why not volunteer? Try out online auction sites such as Ebay, bargains are to be had with a little research and patience. Look in roadside skips I’ve always found people are happy to give you things would otherwise have gone to landfill.

angie-fine-little-dayFine little day: ideas, collections and interiors by Elisabeth Dunker

Take a peek into the fascinating life of Elisabeth Dunker: blogger, writer, stylist, designer, photographer and artist. This is a woman of many talents, and the book showcases her unique skill and style. Her handmade pot holder blanket is an inspiration to behold. This book makes me want to move to Scandinavia and live in her cabin!

angie-cheap-chicCheap chic: affordable ideas for a relaxed home by Emily Chalmers

Just a lovely coffee table book, enjoy flicking through the pages for the sheer pleasure of it
If you are in need for inspiration then Pinterest is the answer to all your dreams.  If you have a smart phone or IPad/tablet download the Pinterest App and create your own pin board of ideas.
If you want to have a go selling your handmade wares or turn a crafting hobby into a living then check out crafting websites such as Etsy and Folksy to see what you can sell. They each employ a basic level of quality control so a bowl made out of play dough whilst fun to make probably wouldn’t cut the muster.

angie-rediscovered-treasuresRediscovered treasures by Ellen Dyrop

This book is a ‘must read’ for anyone hoping to style their own wedding as there are centrepieces and accessories that you can make that would add an air of romance to any humble village hall. On my wish list to make is the family heirloom cushion using old transferable photos and would make a thoughtful and memorable present for your nearest and dearest.

angie-thrifty-lampshades50 thrifty DIY lampshades by Adeline Lobut

I’ve never understood why lampshades so expensive to buy when the principle is so easy. What’s more you can use a fabric of your choice and add as many embellishments as your heart desires. The market has begun to recognise the upcycling trend and there are now DIY lampshade kits available to buy. Alternatively, borrow this book from Leeds libraries and have the pleasure of making one from scratch. I love the idea of using old books and men’s ties to create a stand or shade. If you want to show off your eco-friendly credentials there are even instructions for making a living lamp made out of green foliage.

angie-homespun-styleHomespun style by Selina Lake

This is book once borrowed I had to buy..
Indeed why all these books beckon to me is they inspire me to be creative. I hope you are inspired to have a go too!

Angie, Assistant Community Librarian

 

Keep them occupied!

The summer holidays are here! Time for kicking back and relaxing. Or, if you are a parent of children of a certain age, a six week quest to keep them occupied. Here in Leeds Libraries we have just bought a whole load of new children’s non fiction books that should be arriving in your local library any time now and we have a range that should be of interest, whatever your child is in to. If the right book doesn’t make it to your library, then you can reserve it for free to bring it to you.

Crafters and Artists

My daughter could, from an early age, create anything she wanted provided that we had sellotape and paper. Sometimes you need to harness those creatives and this selection of books should do just that.

CNF lets sewLet’s Sew, pub Dorling Kindersley

Your child will learn how to sew in no time with this book. From threading needles and sewing a running stitch to following patterns, ‘Let’s Sew’ teaches your child how to create their very own collection of eye-catching toys and accessories, including a decorated book bag, felt elephants, and jungle-themed pen toppers.

CNF Paper craftsPaper Crafts by Annalees Lim

This series is aimed at kids who love to be creative. By following the clear and simple step-by-step instructions, they will be able to create fashionable, original, cute, and humerous creations.

CNF How to drawHow to draw by Nick Sharratt

Jacqueline Wilson’s world of characters has been brought to life brilliantly with Nick Sharratt’s illustrations. Now your budding artist can learn how to draw them themselves.

CNF 23 ways23 ways to be a great artist: a step by step guide to creating artwork inspired by famous masterpieces by Jennifer McCully

This text is for aspiring artists. The book is packed full of step-by-step projects for crafty kids eager to discover the secrets to creating a masterpiece.

Scientists

Is your child the kind that likes to take things to bits as well as putting them together because they want to see how it works? These books are for them.

CNF SpaceSpace pub Franklin

Planets, asteroids, space travel and exploration are just some of the incredible topics you will learn about in this book. Discover what they are, what we know about them and how scientists intend to find out more about them.

CNF ExperimentsSuper Science: experiments!: 80 cool experiments to try at home by Tom Adams

This exciting lift-the-flap novelty book is packed with simple science experiments for kids to try at home. Each page will see keen young scientists try their hands at anything from building bridges to making food explode and mixing up meringues – all in the name of science! Every experiment is accompanied by a simple explanation of the science involved, making it hands-on educational fun.

CNF wacky scienceTotally wacky facts about exploring space by Emma Carlson Berne

Do you know which astronaut played golf on the moon? Ever wondered how much a space suit weighs? Have you thought about what astronauts do with their dirty underwear? Out-of-this-world facts and a bright, bold design will keep struggling and reluctant readers wanting more!

CNF your bonesYour Bones by Sally Hewitt

How many bones are in your body? Which bone protects your brain? What are bones made of? Find the answers to these questions and much, much more in this picture-packed introduction to the human body.

CNF OceanOcean: a children’s encyclopedia by John Woodward

A stunning visual encyclopedia for kids, packed with stunning photography and amazing facts on every aspect of ocean life. From the Arctic to the Caribbean, tiny plankton to giant whales, sandy beaches to the deepest depths, our oceans are brought to life with astonishing images.
The Next Bill Gates
Makes those hours in front of a screen mean something. Let them make the game, not just play it!
CNF Learn to programLearn to program by Heather Lyons
This looks at the basics of programming – what is an algorithm, basic languages and building a simple program. We then look at how simple programs can be developed to include decision making and repeat activities, and then how they can be fixed using debugging techniques. Throughout the book there are practical activities to assist learning, and links to online activities where they can practice newly learned skills.
By breaking this daunting subject down into the 10 ‘super skills’ needed, young readers can to get to grips with computer coding, and build on their skills as they progress through the book.
CNF Maths journey
Go on a real-life maths journey to practice the core topics of numbers, geometry, statistics, ratio and proportion, algebra and measurement. Through data visualisation methods, including colourful diagrams, pictograms, illustrations, photographs and infographics, ‘Go Figure!’ brings maths into the real world in an innovative, exciting and engaging visual way. It makes even the trickiest problem easier to understand and builds valuable confidence in maths!

 

 

 

 

Librarian’s Choice – Ferret Books

Generally when I ask a librarian to recommend a selection of books for the blog, I know what sort of books that I might get. However this list has come from total leftfield. These books are compiled by Montse, an Assistant Community Librarian based in the East of the city. I hope it is useful for anyone who is, or wants to be a ferret lover!

Dogs, cats, rabbits and hamsters are 4 of the most usual pets people have at home. Fish, reptiles and birds come next; you’ll find ferrets towards the end of the list. You may have seen ferrets racing through pipes at country and game fairs, or biting Richard Whiteley on telly back on 1977 (if you are not just a nipper).

Maybe you know someone who keeps ferrets or perhaps you may be thinking of getting one or two yourself? Whichever the case you’ll find many a book in the library to furnish you with knowledge and tell you all about how to look after, care, train and enjoy playing or even hunt with ferrets. Here are a few I’ve borrowed myself. I keep my friend’s 3 jill at home on a “part-time” basis and I’ve learned lots by reading these books.

Montse Ferrets McKimmeyFerrets by Vickie McKimmey

Ferrets are lively, domestic pets that can provide great entertainment and companionship. In this book you can find out how to prepare your house for adopting a ferret, as well as essential care information to ensure he is healthy and happy. It has about 100 pages of information from pet care and animal experts—with a family-friendly design, over 60 full-colour photographs, and helpful tip boxes. It comes also with advice on feeding, housing, grooming, training, health care, and fun activities.

Montse Ferrets RickardFerrets: Care and Breeding by Ian C. Rickard

The author is an experienced ferret owner and breeder and he provides the reader with lots of info about all aspects of the ferret’s care and management. It looks at the history, origins, and scientific classification of ferrets; their anatomy and physiology; handling and housing; breeding and rearing; feeding and nutritional requirements; colour-breeding genetics and colour standards for showing; and health and welfare. This is a very useful book if you’re thinking of not just keeping but breeding ferrets.

Montse Ferret SchillingFerrets for Dummies by Kim Schilling

Like any other “for dummies” book here you’ve got THE ultimate reference to all aspects of keeping a ferret. Almost 400 pages – I still haven’t finished reading my own copy – of information organised by chapters so you can go directly to the topic you need. So there’s extra info on things like diets, teeth, diseases, housing, games, vets, etc. etc. The only downside is that it’s not as colourful and hasn’t got as many illustrations as other books.

Monste Ferret BuckleHalf my Facebook friends are ferrets by J.A. Buckle

Ok, so this is not a reference book but Teenage Fiction, but you learn one or two things about ferrets when you read about Josh’s life in his diary and his struggle to achieve some goals before he’s 16. When I picked this book I thought he was going to have lots of ferrets (by looking at the title) but he only has one, Ozzy, who bites and escapes of its cage all the time. Easy read, very funny and realistic; many subjects other than ferrets are included in this book like being popular, becoming a rock star, girlfriends, life at home when you are a teen, etc. totally recommended if you want a good laugh.

Montse Ferret WhiteheadFerreting: An Essential Guide by Simon Whitehead

Here’s a really good book by a professional ferreter with lots of information about how to catch rabbits using ferrets and nets. He gives good advice on looking after the ferrets, transport, collars and finder units, working together with dogs, nets and digging, and the like; but also you’ll learn about rabbits, their habits, feeding, and behaviour. You may not need this book if you just want to keep ferrets as pets, but it will be appreciated by those with and interest in country pursuits.

Monste Ferret WellsteadThe Ferret and Ferreting guide by Graham Wellstead

I liked this book very much because it gives clear and useful information about ferrets in all main aspects and it’s a good guide to read when you are a beginner. Advice is given on selecting ferrets, their care, feeding and housing, and how to breed from them. It has some funny anecdotes by the author and  his experiences on training ferrets to hunt; the techniques and use of equipment is fully described and there is a guide to the legal aspects of hunting. Distinguishing coat colours in B&W photos was a bit tricky, though.

Montse Ferret BuckleStudies in the art of rat-catching by H.C. Barkley

This is a very special and old book, published in 1896, and you will only find it in the Information and Research department of the Central Library. It’s reference only, so no taking home allowed. Despite the book’s title, as much of the content is devoted to ferrets and rabbit control as it is to rat catching. It details such varied subjects as Ratting Tools, Learning Dog Language, Rabbit Catching, Long Netting, Ratting Dogs etc. This excellent title is recommended for all true countrymen. Many of the earliest sporting books, particularly those dating back to the 1800s, are now extremely scarce and very expensive, so having a read of this book for free makes you feel part of a lucky elite.

Montse Ferret ColsonFerret (the pet to get) by Rob Colson

This is a good reference book for children; aimed at 9+ year olds, it gives easy to understand information and advice about what entitles to have a ferret as a pet. This book is a good read is you need to decide whether a ferret (or ferrets) would be a suitable pet for you and your children. It tells about character and behaviour, good and bad habits, how to look after them, etc. It also has a section about polecats and hunting with ferrets. With 32 pages this book is not too long to bore and has lovely photos.

Montse Ferret McNicholasFerrets (keeping ‘unusual’ pets) by June McNicholas

This is another really good book for children as introduction to ferrets. It explains the good points and not-so-good points about keeping ferrets and how to become the carer of healthy animals. Find out about the basic requirements, such as housing, food, water and exercise, and how to provide companionship for your ferrets. It contains information on the natural behaviour of ferrets, expert advice and tips on how to be a good ferret carer and a glossary of difficult and unusual terms.

Montse Ferret FrainThe Pet Ferret Handbook by Seán Frain

I haven’t read this book myself but the synopsis given online sounds quite good: “specifically designed for keepers of domestic ferrets in homes and apartments, this book covers the history of the ferret, how to choose the right pet, housing, feeding, house training, hygiene, exercise, breeding and even exhibiting.” The author is a well-known Patterdale terrier breeder from Cumbria, who has written lots of books on related subjects. It will definitely go onto my “To Read” list.

Librarian’s Choice – Tea Party Books

This new delicious collection of books is from Sapphia, an Assistant Community Librarian based in Moor Allerton.

This collection of books can help you create the perfect supper (dessert) club or dream tea party full of yummy sweets, baked treats, cocktails and interesting activities to keep everyone entertained. It might mean you will spend some time on it, but you never know you could be so good at it like Mrs Marmite Lovers that you can make a business out of it. At very least you’ll have fun eating and drinking all your delicious homemade goodies in good company.
I will apologise this list is full of the sweet stuff; I don’t have much time for sandwiches when there is so much choice in cakes and sweets!

Everything OzEverything Oz- The wizard book of makes and bakes by Christine Leech and Hanna Read- Baldrey

This is an amazing book full of ideas and charm; there are templates galore to help you create your very own world of Oz including a twisting Tin Man and a dancing Scarecrow, Cowardly Lion hand puppets and giant Poppies. You and your guests can feast on green lemonade and cherry pie in a facemask of eternal youth, surrounded by a field of giant poppies you can learn how to create.
View it all through a pair of your very own emerald glasses to view the glow in the dark jelly Emerald City. And when it all gets a little too much and it’s time to go home, fortunately this book also shows you how to make your own Wishing star and the all-important pair of Ruby Slippers!
There’s no place like home. Especially when there’s a tea party to be had.

Homemade sweetshopMrs Beeton’s Homemade Sweetshop: Our favourite sweets to make, give and enjoy by Isabella Beeton and Gerard Baker

This book with its beautiful cut out sweetshop window design has all the recipes for sweet treats to accommodate any tea party guest’s desires, including chocolate honeycomb, rose and violet creams, vanilla fudge and silvered orange slices. It gives you a great little guide to working with different types of sugar including the sugar stages and temperatures you need to get your sugar to, to create all the different types of sweets. The authors sweep through the history of sweets and how they came to be so popular, useful equipment to use for sweet making, methods of storage and gift packaging. Lots of nostalgic recipes to remind you of your own childhood favourite sweets and something yummy for your guests to nibble, whilst they wait for the tea to brew. Or even better, with your new found skills at gift packaging, a goody bag to take home.

secret tea partyMs Marmite Lovers Secret Tea Party: Exquisite recipes for the ultimate afternoon tea by Kerstin Rodgers

Ms Marmite Lovers knows more than a thing or two about Afternoon tea, whether it is a cream tea, a low tea or a high tea, there will be recipes of indulgence on every page of this book. The pioneer of underground Supper clubs from 2009, Kerstin Rodgers started the craze of Pop-Up restaurants and is still highly sought after due to the exquisite detail she puts in to all her events. This book helps you think about everything to create a fabulous vintage tea party, setting the table, lay out, making your own teacup candles and cake stands as well as how to read tea leaves. On top of this you get lots of yummy recipes like teacakes with rose water and cinnamon and mini cherry bakewells. There are also instructions on how to make a perfect cup of tea, giving you optimum temperatures, brewing times and recipes.

quinntessential bakingQuinntessential Baking by Frances Quinn

A lot of people will know Frances Quinn for winning the BBC’S Great British Bake off. A designer and a baker at heart, each recipe is beautifully executed and there are cute supporting illustrations throughout the book. Although these recipes do require time and dedication, you are guided through all techniques. The designs do also allow for a few imperfections, whist still looking like showstoppers. My favourite recipes include the bonfire cupcakes, with glazed sugar fire and carrot candle cakes, with real looking chocolate candles and edible melted white chocolate wax which would be perfect for a birthday or celebration. You can even pretend to light them with the edible chocolate biscuit tipped matchsticks. (Recipe also in this book!)
You would be sure to impress any tea party guest with these bakes, just make sure you have quite a bit of time and don’t get too disheartened if yours doesn’t look exactly like the picture. Frances gets to spend all day on hers, practicing and practicing till it’s photo ready.

Vintage sweets bookThe Vintage Sweets Book by Angel Adoree

Angel Adoree takes all the flavours from your favourite childhood sweets such as jazzies, cola cubes and white chocolate mice and helps you to not only make those sweets yourself but also have an adult alternative, a cocktail! My favourite cocktail recipes in this collection are the Rhubarb and Custard cocktail- with advocaat and brandy and the Rocktail- a cocktail using the classic seaside rock and ginger liquor. The book is also full of little finishing touches that you may want to add to your tea party including spinning tops, cocktail monkeys, organza pom poms and harlequin puppets. It’s time to be an adult, but still have that childhood wonder.

friends at my tableFriends at my table by Alice Hart

Friends at my table is a book full of moreish rustic meals, set out according to the season so that you can do exactly as Alice does, and use the 12 separate menu’s on all kinds of occasions including a wedding shower! These meals are mostly savoury and a lot more wholesome but are great at helping you cater for a larger group. On top of the recipes and lovely summery hazed photography there’s lots of great activities that Alice encourages you to incorporate at your supper club. There are some fab ideas such as wild swimming, how to forage for food, light a pit fire and even how to play basic beach cricket. This I accept may be a little far-fetched for some of us, best not to have our guest poisoned on a foraging trip or almost drown in a dangerous river! But it’s about thinking outside the box. Take advantage of your surroundings, and the company you have around you. This book has great tips on how to keep you and your guests entertained as well as well fed. And not to disappoint you on the sweet pudding front, there’s a recipe for a black forest Sundae. Delicious!

Domestic goddessHow to Be a Domestic Goddess: Baking and the Art of Comfort Cooking by Nigella Lawson

From the lady that states, ‘I don’t believe you can ever really cook unless you love eating.’ A list about making food for guests had to include Nigella Lawson. This is the book that started a new obsession with baking luxurious food that we knew would certainly be calorie laden but used great fresh ingredients and recipes that made you feel indulgent and comforted. These bakes are definitely something you want to show off to guests. There is a white chocolate rocky road, a damp lemon cake and a winter plum pudding with clear instructions and tips for a great result. These recipes try and get you to fall in love with baking, taking your time and allowing you to be fully prepared, so that when it comes to the eating, you can share the joy with your guests. Sexualising the food and the baking equipment, like Nigella, is at your own personal risk. Remember we are all adults now. We are at our very first step to becoming a domestic Goddess or God.