Children’s Writing Competition: Leeds Big Bookend

logo_finalThe Big Bookend are currently running a writing competition aimed at young writers in the city. They would like you to write a short story or poem about the First World War. If you are between 7 and 16 and you do then you could win a prize. The competition is part of the ‘First World War and Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty: Leeds Pals, POWs and the Home Front’ project and in association with the Leeds Big Bookend.

You could be a budding writer with an interest in the First World War or someone who works with young people who are studying the First World War.  The competition aims to encourage young people from Yorkshire to reflect on and write about the First World War – be it war at sea, theatres of war around the world or the war on the Home Front here in Yorkshire. Stories that reflect on the impact of the First World War on local people and places are encouraged. Entries could be short stories, poem or verse, as long as they meet the terms of entry described below. The winning entries will be published on Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s and the Leeds Big Bookend’s websites and used in other displays and presentations as part of the First World War Centenary project.

For further details about the project and about the Big Bookend Festival, have a look at their website.

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Writing competitions closing in May

The Bridport Prize

 

Up to 5,000 words for the short story; 42 lines for the poem.

The poem and short story categories each have a first prize of £5,000, second prize £1,000 and third prize £500. An additional 10 supplementary prizes (for each category) of £50 each are awarded. A new category for flash fiction with a prize of £1,000 was launched in 2010. There is a second prize of £500, 3rd prize of £250 and 3 supplementary prizes of £50. In 2014 the Peggy Chapman-Andrews first novel award, named after the Prize’s founder, was launched. The first prize is £1,000 plus a up to a year’s mentoring from The Literary Consultancy. A runner-up prize of £500 is also offered.

Entry fee – short story: £9 each; poem: £8 each  – open to anyone over 16 from the UK or overseas.

Closing date: 31 May

 

London Magazine’s Poetry Competition

Opens  for entry 1 April

First prize: £300, second – £200, third -£150.

The winning poem will be published in a future issue of The London Magazine, both in print and online. The runners up will be featured on the website.

Entry fee:  £7, subsequent poems £5

Closing date:  31 May

 

Frome Festival short story competition

Any theme, between 1000 and 2200 words.

First Prize, £300, second £150, third  £75

Winning stories will be read by a leading London literary agent and suitable stories will be forwarded (with the writer’s agreement) to IPC Magazines/ Frome fm radio station for consideration.

Entry fee: £5

Closing date: 31 May

 

WritersReign short story competition

Stories of between 1,000 and 1,500 words on any  theme

Prizes: 1st – £100.00; 2nd – £50.00; 3rd – £25.00 plus 3 Highly Commended – £10.00

Entry fee: £3.50 per story, £6 for two

Closing date: 31sMay 2015

The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize longlist

While the gods were sleepingWe like some translated fiction, so it’s great to have these titles longlisted for The Independent Foreign Fiction Prize

It’s warded to honour contemporary fiction in translation and worth £10,000 in prize money has published its longlist – chosen from 111 titles from 28 languages

The prize is divided equally between author and translator, recognising the importance of the translator in his/her ability to bridge the gap between languages and cultures.

Haruki Murakami –  Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage translated from the Japanese by Philip Gabriel. The book follows the title character, who as an adult goes on a journey to find out why his childhood friends stopped speaking to him suddenly.

Karl Ove KnausgaardBoyhood Island translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett. Boyhood Island is the third book in Knausgaard’s My Struggle series, and sees the author revisiting his childhood.

The dead lakeThen five German titles –

Look Who’s Back by Timur Vermes, translator Jamie Bulloch, about Hitler waking up in 2011.

F by Daniel Kehlmann about two brothers with nothing in common, translatorCarol Brown.

The End of Days by Jenny Erpenbeck, translator Susan Bernofsky, follows the possible lives of one woman in the 20th century.

The Giraffe’s Neck by Judith Schalansky translator Shaun Whiteside, about a biology teacher who believes in the survival of the fittest who has to learn to adapt.

Tiger Milk by Stefanie de Velasco translatory Tim Mohr, about two best friends growing up.

The Investigation by Jung-Myung Lee,  Korean translated by Chi-Young Kim, about a murder at a Korean Bloodlinesprison in 1944. Lee is only the second Korean writer to feature on the prize’s longlist in its 25-year history.

The Last Lover by Can Xue, Chinese, translator Annelise Finegan Wasmoen, tale of a series of husbands, wives & lovers.

Two Spanish novels – In the Beginning Was the Sea by Tomás González translator Frank Wynne, about a couple who abandon city life for a new life on a remote tropical coast. Wynne won in 2005 with his translation of Windows on the World by Frédéric Beigbeder

By Night the Mountain Burns by Juan Tomás Ávila Laurel translator Jethro Soutar, recounts the narrator’s childhood on a remote island off the West African coast.

The Ravens by Tomas Bannerhed translated from the Swedish by Sarah Death, a story of a father & son in ’70s Sweden.

Bloodlines by Marcello Fois, Italian, translated by Silvester Mazzarella, is about the lives and loves of the Chironi family.

The Dead Lake by Hamid Ismailov. Andrew Bromfield translated from Russian; it’s about the Cold War’s environmental legacy

While the Gods Were Sleeping by Erwin Mortier Dutch, translator Paul Vincent. An old woman looks back at her life.

The shortlist will be announced on Thursday 9th April. The winner will be announced on Wednesday 27th May.

 

 

 

Writing competitions closing in April

Kishboo magazine short story competition

Ongoing short story competition – stories must be no more than 2,000 words

Entry fee: £3

First prize -£50 ,  runner- up f £25

Closing date:  20 April

 

First Crediton Short Story Competition

Stories on the theme GENERATIONS

  • 16/18* or over –  a maximum of 3,000 words. Prize £50 & a night’s stay at the Lamb Inn, Sandford. Runner-up: £20.
  • 12 to 16/18* –  a maximum of 1,000. First prize – £25 book token, second prize – £10 book token.
  • 5 to 7 or 8 to 11 – a maximum of 500. first prize for each age group – £20 book token, second prize – £10 book token

*for the purpose of this competition adults are 18 years & over and those aged 16-18 not in full-time education. Top stories in each group published on www.creditoncommunitybookshop.co.uk

 Closing date: 24 April

 

The Bath Short Story Competition

The competition is international, up to 2200 words.

First prize £1000, 2nd prize £200, 3rd prize £100. Local prize of £50 in book tokens sponsored by Mr B’s Emporium of Books, Bath and The Acorn Award, a £50 prize for an unpublished writer

Entry fee: £8

Closing date: 27th April

 

Bristol Short Story Prize

No particular theme, up to 4,000 words.

First prize is £1,000 plus a £150 Waterstones gift card, 2nd prize is £700 plus a £100 Waterstones gift card and 3rd prize is £400 plus a £100 Waterstones gift card.

Entry fee: £8 for each story entered.

Closing date: April 30

 

Over the Red Line

Up to 4,500 words on the theme of nature

Prize: £50

Entry fee: looks to be free

Closing date:  30 April

 

Senior Travel Expert City, Town or Village Writing Competition

Up to 750 words by 16 years and over on any city, town or village, factual or fiction

Entry: free

Prize of £100 to the author of the best entry.

Closing date: 30 April

 

Writing Competitions Reinvented

Poetry and short story competition

Short story: any subject; length 750 to 3,000 words; previously unpublished work. Entry fee: £12 . One entry  per person

Poetry: any subject; poetry or prose poetry; maximum 42 lines; previously unpublished work; Entry fee: £7 per poem.

First Prize £2,000 (for each competition)

Closing date: 30 April 2015

 

The  Exeter Story Prize

Stories of up to 10,000 words.

First prize – £500 + trophy, second – £150, third – £100. In addition, CreativeWritingMatters has announced: The Trisha Ashley Award for the best humorous story – £200 + trophy.

Entry fee: £8

Closing date 30 April 2015

 

 

 

The Wellcome Book Prize shortlist

Bill Bryson, chair of the 2015 £30,000 Wellcome book prize, has said brain surgery, death, cruelty, anxiety and grief are all explored in the shortlisted books – with laughs and joy amid the suffering. The prize celebrates books on an  aspect of medicine, health or illness.

Shortlist

All My Puny Sorrows – Miriam Toews – a novel which deals with suicide

Bodies of Light by Sarah Moss – a Victorian-era story of maternal cruelty and illness.

My Age of Anxiety by Scott Stossel, a personal account of his battle with anxiety

The Incredible Unlikeliness of Being by Alice Roberts, BBC presenter & Guardian columnist. She takes a tour around the human body

 Do No Harm by Henry Marsh, in which he gives readers an insight into his working life as a neurosurgeon

The Iceberg by Marion Coutts, an account of the illness and death of her husband, the critic Tom Lubbock.

Bryson said the books were very different but what they had in common was the quality of writing and the depth of content.  He said his entry into science had been through literature, and one of the key aims of the Wellcome prize was to encourage others to follow the same path.

The winner will be announced on the 29th April.

Great Reads @BaileysPrize Fiction longlist is announced

Longlist for Bailey's Women's PrizeThe Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction longlist features some great reads. With five debut novelists and eight previously shortlisted authors, it showcases both rising stars and well-established writers.

Chair of the judging panel Shami Chakrabarti said: “The Prize’s 20th year is a particularly strong one for women’s fiction.  All judges fought hard for their favourites and the result is a 2015 list of 20 to be proud of – with its mix of genres and styles, first-timers and well-known names from around the world. There is a very strong showing of UK writers and we are all incredibly excited about the final stages of the search for the winner.”

The 20 books will be cut down to a shortlist of six and an overall winner will be chosen by 3rd June.

LonglistBAILEYS Women's Prize for Fiction

Click through on the links to find more information about the books.

Rachel Cusk-  Outline

Lissa Evans – Crooked Heart 5 star rated by Leeds readers

Patricia Ferguson – Aren’t We Sisters?

Xiaolu Guo – I Am China

Samantha Harvey –  Dear Thief

Emma Healey – Elizabeth is Missing

Emily St. John Mandel – Station Eleven

Grace McCleen – The Offering

Sandra Newman – The Country of Ice Cream Star

Heather O’Neill – The Girl Who Was Saturday Night

Laline Paull – The Bees

Marie Phillips – The Table of Less Valued Knights

Rachel Seiffert – The Walk Home

Kamila Shamsie – A God in Every Stone

Ali Smith – How to be Both

Sara Taylor – The Shore

Anne Tyler – A Spool of Blue Thread

Sarah Waters – The Paying Guests

Jemma Wayne – After Before

PP Wong – The Life of a Banana

Calling all budding young authors!

Have you got an aspiring young writer in the family? The spaghetti yeti

Budding young writers can have a spring in their step thanks to a great new story competition. And there is even the chance for them to have their story read out at Leeds Central Library as the prize. The Yorkshire Evening Post has teamed up with Leeds Library and Information Service for this Spring-themed contest.

To enter children just have to write a story of 200 words or less. It must also start with the following intro which is not included in the word count.

“It really felt like the first day of Spring. Amongst the snowdrops I saw something sparkling on the grass…….. ”

There will be categories for primary schoolchildren, secondary schoolchildren and pupils at special schools. The winning stories will then be read out by Leeds illustrator and author of Mariella Mystery Investigates series, Kate Pankhurst on April 10. The winners will also have a chance to meet Kate.

All entries by email to hannah.start@jpress.co.uk or sent in using the share a story button  www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk by March 20th 2015. Entries may appear in the paper and online.

Usual Johnston Press rules apply, go to http://www.johnstonpress.co.uk/competition