Children’s Writing Competition: Leeds Big Bookend

logo_finalThe Big Bookend are currently running a writing competition aimed at young writers in the city. They would like you to write a short story or poem about the First World War. If you are between 7 and 16 and you do then you could win a prize. The competition is part of the ‘First World War and Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty: Leeds Pals, POWs and the Home Front’ project and in association with the Leeds Big Bookend.

You could be a budding writer with an interest in the First World War or someone who works with young people who are studying the First World War.  The competition aims to encourage young people from Yorkshire to reflect on and write about the First World War – be it war at sea, theatres of war around the world or the war on the Home Front here in Yorkshire. Stories that reflect on the impact of the First World War on local people and places are encouraged. Entries could be short stories, poem or verse, as long as they meet the terms of entry described below. The winning entries will be published on Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s and the Leeds Big Bookend’s websites and used in other displays and presentations as part of the First World War Centenary project.

For further details about the project and about the Big Bookend Festival, have a look at their website.

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Writing competitions closing in May

The Bridport Prize

 

Up to 5,000 words for the short story; 42 lines for the poem.

The poem and short story categories each have a first prize of £5,000, second prize £1,000 and third prize £500. An additional 10 supplementary prizes (for each category) of £50 each are awarded. A new category for flash fiction with a prize of £1,000 was launched in 2010. There is a second prize of £500, 3rd prize of £250 and 3 supplementary prizes of £50. In 2014 the Peggy Chapman-Andrews first novel award, named after the Prize’s founder, was launched. The first prize is £1,000 plus a up to a year’s mentoring from The Literary Consultancy. A runner-up prize of £500 is also offered.

Entry fee – short story: £9 each; poem: £8 each  – open to anyone over 16 from the UK or overseas.

Closing date: 31 May

 

London Magazine’s Poetry Competition

Opens  for entry 1 April

First prize: £300, second – £200, third -£150.

The winning poem will be published in a future issue of The London Magazine, both in print and online. The runners up will be featured on the website.

Entry fee:  £7, subsequent poems £5

Closing date:  31 May

 

Frome Festival short story competition

Any theme, between 1000 and 2200 words.

First Prize, £300, second £150, third  £75

Winning stories will be read by a leading London literary agent and suitable stories will be forwarded (with the writer’s agreement) to IPC Magazines/ Frome fm radio station for consideration.

Entry fee: £5

Closing date: 31 May

 

WritersReign short story competition

Stories of between 1,000 and 1,500 words on any  theme

Prizes: 1st – £100.00; 2nd – £50.00; 3rd – £25.00 plus 3 Highly Commended – £10.00

Entry fee: £3.50 per story, £6 for two

Closing date: 31sMay 2015

Calling all budding crime writers

How to write crime fictionNew book this week, How to write crime fiction by Sarah Williams

This book provides a comprehensive overview of all the different kinds of crime fiction, with examples from successful contemporary writers in each of the different genres, and clear explanations and exercises to help the beginning writer hone their craft, and discover the kind of crime fiction, the plots, the themes, the language, that work best for them

 And find out how the experts do it Talking about detective fiction by P. D James

Dealing with the craft of detective writing and sharing her personal thoughts and observations on one of the most popular and enduring forms of literature, the author examines the challenges, achievements, and potential of this genre.

The crime writer’s guide to police practice and procedure by Michael O’Byrne – ‘The Crime Writer’s Guide To Police Practice And Procedure’ is the detective in your pocket – something you can reach for when you feel your writing needs that short sharp shock of real-life investigating

 

 

 

Writing competitions closing in April

Kishboo magazine short story competition

Ongoing short story competition – stories must be no more than 2,000 words

Entry fee: £3

First prize -£50 ,  runner- up f £25

Closing date:  20 April

 

First Crediton Short Story Competition

Stories on the theme GENERATIONS

  • 16/18* or over –  a maximum of 3,000 words. Prize £50 & a night’s stay at the Lamb Inn, Sandford. Runner-up: £20.
  • 12 to 16/18* –  a maximum of 1,000. First prize – £25 book token, second prize – £10 book token.
  • 5 to 7 or 8 to 11 – a maximum of 500. first prize for each age group – £20 book token, second prize – £10 book token

*for the purpose of this competition adults are 18 years & over and those aged 16-18 not in full-time education. Top stories in each group published on www.creditoncommunitybookshop.co.uk

 Closing date: 24 April

 

The Bath Short Story Competition

The competition is international, up to 2200 words.

First prize £1000, 2nd prize £200, 3rd prize £100. Local prize of £50 in book tokens sponsored by Mr B’s Emporium of Books, Bath and The Acorn Award, a £50 prize for an unpublished writer

Entry fee: £8

Closing date: 27th April

 

Bristol Short Story Prize

No particular theme, up to 4,000 words.

First prize is £1,000 plus a £150 Waterstones gift card, 2nd prize is £700 plus a £100 Waterstones gift card and 3rd prize is £400 plus a £100 Waterstones gift card.

Entry fee: £8 for each story entered.

Closing date: April 30

 

Over the Red Line

Up to 4,500 words on the theme of nature

Prize: £50

Entry fee: looks to be free

Closing date:  30 April

 

Senior Travel Expert City, Town or Village Writing Competition

Up to 750 words by 16 years and over on any city, town or village, factual or fiction

Entry: free

Prize of £100 to the author of the best entry.

Closing date: 30 April

 

Writing Competitions Reinvented

Poetry and short story competition

Short story: any subject; length 750 to 3,000 words; previously unpublished work. Entry fee: £12 . One entry  per person

Poetry: any subject; poetry or prose poetry; maximum 42 lines; previously unpublished work; Entry fee: £7 per poem.

First Prize £2,000 (for each competition)

Closing date: 30 April 2015

 

The  Exeter Story Prize

Stories of up to 10,000 words.

First prize – £500 + trophy, second – £150, third – £100. In addition, CreativeWritingMatters has announced: The Trisha Ashley Award for the best humorous story – £200 + trophy.

Entry fee: £8

Closing date 30 April 2015

 

 

 

The Wellcome Book Prize shortlist

Bill Bryson, chair of the 2015 £30,000 Wellcome book prize, has said brain surgery, death, cruelty, anxiety and grief are all explored in the shortlisted books – with laughs and joy amid the suffering. The prize celebrates books on an  aspect of medicine, health or illness.

Shortlist

All My Puny Sorrows – Miriam Toews – a novel which deals with suicide

Bodies of Light by Sarah Moss – a Victorian-era story of maternal cruelty and illness.

My Age of Anxiety by Scott Stossel, a personal account of his battle with anxiety

The Incredible Unlikeliness of Being by Alice Roberts, BBC presenter & Guardian columnist. She takes a tour around the human body

 Do No Harm by Henry Marsh, in which he gives readers an insight into his working life as a neurosurgeon

The Iceberg by Marion Coutts, an account of the illness and death of her husband, the critic Tom Lubbock.

Bryson said the books were very different but what they had in common was the quality of writing and the depth of content.  He said his entry into science had been through literature, and one of the key aims of the Wellcome prize was to encourage others to follow the same path.

The winner will be announced on the 29th April.

Catherine Aird – winner of the Diamond Dagger for crime writing

Dead headingHave you read any Catherine Aird? She’s won this year’s prestigious Diamond Dagger award for crime writing, following in the footsteps of luminaries such as Simon Brett, P.D James, Lee Child and Frederick Forsyth.

The winner of the Diamond Dagger is chosen from a shortlist of authors nominated by the Crime Writers Association members. It features writers judged worthy by their peers and they must meet two essential criteria-  their careers must be marked by sustained excellence, and they must have made a significant contribution to crime fiction published in the English language, whether originally or in translation. The award is made purely on merit without reference to age, gender or nationality.

Catherine Aird’s career spans over six decades and she’s written over twenty novels, including the popular Chronicles of Calleshire.

Despite being such a prolific and popular author, Catherine was still surprised to discover she was to be presented the highest honour in the crime writing genre. “It feels very nice indeed, I can assure you! I am absolutely delighted. I’m so glad to be part of such a happy group as the CWA and we do all tend to read each other’s work. I think I’ve enjoyed writing my books probably more than my readers have enjoyed reading them.”

The Diamond Dagger will be presented to Catherine at the Hotel Russell in London on 30th June 2015.

Sunday Times short story shortlist is out

Thunderstruck & other storiesThe Sunday Times short story award  is open to stories under 6,000 words written by fiction writers who have been published in the UK or Ireland. The winner of the prize receives £30,000, the other shortlisted writers each receive £1,000. In the six years the award has been running, it has never been won by a British writer, or a woman.

Yiyun Li, a previous nominee – “A Sheltered Woman” follows a Chinese-American nanny. Her latest novel is Kinder than Solitude

American author Elizabeth McCracken“Hungry”(this is in Thunderstruck)

Canadian writer Madeleine Thien“The Wedding Cake”, which sees four friends who grew up in war-torn Lebanon reuniting after decades apart.

Kinder than solitude: a novelBritish newcomer Rebecca F John – “The Glove Maker’s Numbers“, about a woman grieving over her brother.

New Zealander Paula Morris –  “False River”

American writer Scott O’Connor -“Interstellar Space”.

Previous winners include Pultizer Prize-winners Adam Johnson and Junot Diaz.