Children’s Writing Competition: Leeds Big Bookend

logo_finalThe Big Bookend are currently running a writing competition aimed at young writers in the city. They would like you to write a short story or poem about the First World War. If you are between 7 and 16 and you do then you could win a prize. The competition is part of the ‘First World War and Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty: Leeds Pals, POWs and the Home Front’ project and in association with the Leeds Big Bookend.

You could be a budding writer with an interest in the First World War or someone who works with young people who are studying the First World War.  The competition aims to encourage young people from Yorkshire to reflect on and write about the First World War – be it war at sea, theatres of war around the world or the war on the Home Front here in Yorkshire. Stories that reflect on the impact of the First World War on local people and places are encouraged. Entries could be short stories, poem or verse, as long as they meet the terms of entry described below. The winning entries will be published on Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty’s and the Leeds Big Bookend’s websites and used in other displays and presentations as part of the First World War Centenary project.

For further details about the project and about the Big Bookend Festival, have a look at their website.

Writing competitions closing in May

The Bridport Prize

 

Up to 5,000 words for the short story; 42 lines for the poem.

The poem and short story categories each have a first prize of £5,000, second prize £1,000 and third prize £500. An additional 10 supplementary prizes (for each category) of £50 each are awarded. A new category for flash fiction with a prize of £1,000 was launched in 2010. There is a second prize of £500, 3rd prize of £250 and 3 supplementary prizes of £50. In 2014 the Peggy Chapman-Andrews first novel award, named after the Prize’s founder, was launched. The first prize is £1,000 plus a up to a year’s mentoring from The Literary Consultancy. A runner-up prize of £500 is also offered.

Entry fee – short story: £9 each; poem: £8 each  – open to anyone over 16 from the UK or overseas.

Closing date: 31 May

 

London Magazine’s Poetry Competition

Opens  for entry 1 April

First prize: £300, second – £200, third -£150.

The winning poem will be published in a future issue of The London Magazine, both in print and online. The runners up will be featured on the website.

Entry fee:  £7, subsequent poems £5

Closing date:  31 May

 

Frome Festival short story competition

Any theme, between 1000 and 2200 words.

First Prize, £300, second £150, third  £75

Winning stories will be read by a leading London literary agent and suitable stories will be forwarded (with the writer’s agreement) to IPC Magazines/ Frome fm radio station for consideration.

Entry fee: £5

Closing date: 31 May

 

WritersReign short story competition

Stories of between 1,000 and 1,500 words on any  theme

Prizes: 1st – £100.00; 2nd – £50.00; 3rd – £25.00 plus 3 Highly Commended – £10.00

Entry fee: £3.50 per story, £6 for two

Closing date: 31sMay 2015

Calling all budding crime writers

How to write crime fictionNew book this week, How to write crime fiction by Sarah Williams

This book provides a comprehensive overview of all the different kinds of crime fiction, with examples from successful contemporary writers in each of the different genres, and clear explanations and exercises to help the beginning writer hone their craft, and discover the kind of crime fiction, the plots, the themes, the language, that work best for them

 And find out how the experts do it Talking about detective fiction by P. D James

Dealing with the craft of detective writing and sharing her personal thoughts and observations on one of the most popular and enduring forms of literature, the author examines the challenges, achievements, and potential of this genre.

The crime writer’s guide to police practice and procedure by Michael O’Byrne – ‘The Crime Writer’s Guide To Police Practice And Procedure’ is the detective in your pocket – something you can reach for when you feel your writing needs that short sharp shock of real-life investigating