Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction 2016

The winner of this years Baileys Women’s prize for fiction will be announced tonight at 7.30pm. The lucky winner will win a limited edition bronze known as a ‘Bessie’, created and donated by the artist Grizel Niven  as well as receiving a cheque for £30,000. Lucky them, that’s more than enough to buy a few bottles of Baileys to celebrate.

Have you read all the shortlisted books?

Baileys RubyRuby by Cynthia Bond

Ephram Jennings has never forgotten the beautiful girl with the long braids running through the piney woods of Liberty, their small East Texas town. Young Ruby Bell has suffered beyond imagining, so as soon as she can, she flees suffocating Liberty for the bright pull of 1950s New York. Ruby quickly winds her way into the ripe centre of the city, all the while hoping for a glimpse of the red hair and green eyes of her mother. When a telegram from her cousin forces her to return home, 30-year-old Ruby finds herself reliving the devastating violence of her girlhood. With the terrifying realisation that she might not be strong enough to fight her way back out again, Ruby struggles to survive her memories of the town’s dark past. Meanwhile, Ephram must choose between loyalty to the sister who raised him and the chance for a life with the woman he has loved since he was a boy.

Baileys The Green RoadThe Green Road by Anne Enright

The children of Rosaleen Madigan leave the west of Ireland for lives they never could have imagined in Dublin, New York and various third-world towns. In her early old age their difficult, wonderful mother announces that she’s decided to sell the house and divide the proceeds. Her adult children come back for one last Christmas, with the feeling that their childhoods are being erased, their personal history bought and sold.

Baileys Glorious Heresies

 

The Glorious Heresies by Lisa Mcinerney

One messy murder affects the lives of five misfits who exist on the fringes of Ireland’s post-crash society. Ryan is a 15-year-old drug dealer desperate not to turn out like his alcoholic father, Tony, whose obsession with his unhinged next-door neighbour threatens to ruin him and his family. Georgie is a prostitute, whose willingness to feign a religious conversion has dangerous repercussions, while Maureen, the accidental murderer, has returned to Cork after 40 years in exile to discover that Jimmy, the son she was forced to give up years before, has grown into the most fearsome gangster in the city. In seeking atonement for the murder and a multitude of other perceived sins, she threatens to destroy everything her son has worked so hard for, but her actions risk bringing the intertwined lives of the Irish underworld into the spotlight.

Baileys The Portable VeblenThe Portable Veblen by Elizabeth McKenzie

Meet Veblen. She’s an experienced cheerleader (mainly of her narcissistic, hypochondriac, controlling mother), an amateur translator, and a passionate defender of the anti-consumerist views of her namesake, the economist Thorstein Veblen. She’s also a firm believer in the distinct possibility that the plucky grey squirrel following her around can understand everything she says.

Baileys The Improbability of Love

 

 

The Improbability of Love by Hannah Rothschild

Annie McDee, alone after the disintegration of her long-term relationship and trapped in a dead-end job, is searching for a present for her unsuitable lover in a neglected second-hand shop. Within the jumble of junk and tack, a grimy painting catches her eye. Leaving the store with the picture after spending her meagre savings, she prepares an elaborate dinner for two, only to be stood up, the gift gathering dust on her mantelpiece. But every painting has a story – and if it could speak, what would it tell us? For Annie has stumbled across ‘The Improbability of Love’, a lost masterpiece by Antoine Watteau, one of the most influential French painters of the 18th century.

Baileys A Little LifeA Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara

When four graduates from a small Massachusetts college move to New York to make their way, they’re broke, adrift, and buoyed only by their friendship and ambition. There is kind, handsome Willem, an aspiring actor; JB, a quick-witted, sometimes cruel Brooklyn-born painter seeking entry to the art world; Malcolm, a frustrated architect at a prominent firm; and withdrawn, brilliant, enigmatic Jude, who serves as their centre of gravity. Over the decades, their relationships deepen and darken, tinged by addiction, success, and pride. Yet their greatest challenge, each comes to realise, is Jude himself, by midlife a terrifyingly talented litigator yet an increasingly broken man, his mind and body scarred by an unspeakable childhood, and haunted by what he fears is a degree of trauma that he’ll not only be unable to overcome – but that will define his life forever.

 

Does an award negatively affect a book?

cattonResearch has found  that a book read after winning a prestigious award will likely be judged more negatively than if it’s read in its pre-award days.

“The Paradox of Publicity: How Awards Can Negatively Affect the Evaluation of Quality,” is to be published in the March issue of Administrative Science Quarterly. Researchers Amanda Sharkey and colleague Balázs Kovács of the University of Lugano analysed thousands of reader reviews of 32 pairs of . One book in each pair had won an award – like the Booker Prize, National Book Award or PEN/Faulkner Award – while the other book had been nominated but hadn’t won.

“We found that winning a prestigious prize in the literary world seems to go hand-in-hand with a particularly sharp reduction in ratings of perceived quality,” Sharkey says.

The researchers theorize that a book’s audience increases considerably after an award is announced, as do the diversity and personal tastes of readers. Therefore, a larger sampling of readers is drawn to a prize-winning book, not because of any intrinsic personal interest in the book, but because it has an award attached to it.

To test this theory, Sharkey and Kovács created “predicted” ratings for each book based on the readers’ past ratings of books in the same genre. They then studied the how a book’s predicted ratings change after an award is announced by comparing earlier predicted ratings to post-announcement predicted ratings.

They found that before an award is announced, the predicted ratings of a book about to win are equivalent to the ratings of a book about to lose. But after an award is announced, that shifts and award-winning books have lower predicted ratings than books that don’t win.

“This is direct evidence that prizewinning books tend to attract new readers who wouldn’t normally read and like this particular type of book,” Sharkey says.

These results are likely applicable to other media, including film, according to the researchers. “The types of movies that win Oscars may be very different from the types of movies we watch and like during the nine months of the year when it’s not awards season,” says Sharkey.
Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-02-negatively-award.html#jCp

National Book Awards – some American literature

image-medium (45)The National Book Awards is run by the National Book Foundation in the USA. The Fiction, Non Fiction, Young People’s and Poetry awards have been announced!

The fiction winner is the Good Lord Bird by James McBride. We don’t have all these in stock (links when we do have them) but reserve them if there are ones you’d like to read

FINALISTS

Rachel Kushner, The Flamethrowers  Interview >

Jhumpa Lahiri, The Lowland  – Interview >

Thomas Pynchon, Bleeding Edge (The Penguin Press/Penguin Group USA)

George Saunders, Tenth of December (Random House) – Interview >

FINALISTS:

  • Jill Lepore, Book of Ages: The Life and Opinions of Jane Franklin – Interview >
  • Wendy Lower, Hitler’s Furies: German Women in the Nazi Killing Fields– Interview >
  • Alan Taylor, The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832– Interview >
  • Lawrence Wright, Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, & the Prison of Belief – Interview >

POETRY WINNER: Mary Szybist, Incarnadine: Poems (Graywolf Press) – Interview >

FINALISTS:

  • Frank Bidart, Metaphysical Dog (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) – Interview >
  • Lucie Brock-Broido, Stay, Illusion (Alfred A. Knopf) – Interview >
  • Adrian Matejka, The Big Smoke (Penguin Poets/Penguin Group USA) – Interview >
  • Matt Rasmussen, Black Aperture (Louisiana State University Press) – Interview >

YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE WINNER: Cynthia Kadohata, The Thing About Luck – Interview >

FINALISTS: