Summer Reading – new fiction this week

The sun is shining! Maybe you are just like me, and at the first sight of a sunbeam it means cold drinks and something good to read in the garden. Last night it was a glass of elderflower cordial and Jonathan Unleashed by Meg Rosoff that I am currently reading for my book group.

If you need a few suggestions here are some new fiction titles that have arrived in our libraries this week. There should be something there to tickly your fancy – maybe you need to match your book to your garden tipple?

blood and inkBlood and Ink by Adam Christopher

The CFO of a secretive NYC hedge fund is found murdered – stabbed through the eye with an expensive fountain pen. Sherlock Holmes and Joan Watson discover a link between the victim and a charismatic touring management guru with a doubtful past. But is the solution so clear-cut or is the guru being framed? As secrets are revealed and another victim is found murdered in the same grisly fashion, Holmes and Watson begin to uncover a murky world of money and deceit.

the french lessonThe French Lesson by Hallie Rubenhold

Paris, 1792: Henrietta – an Englishwoman alone amidst the French Revolution. Grace – former mistress to the highest rulers in France. Agnes – the current mistress, who will stop at nothing to keep her place in the palace. Together, the three women will engage in a deadly triangle of rivalry and power play. Who will win, who will lose and who will keep their head?

 

Eden GardensEden Gardens by Louise Brown

Calcutta, the 1940s. In a ramshackle house, streets away from the grand colonial mansions of the British, live Maisy, her Mam and their ayah, Pushpa. Whiskey-fuelled and poverty-stricken, Mam entertains officers in the night – a disgrace to British India. All hopes are on beautiful Maisy to restore their good fortune. But Maisy’s more at home in the city’s forbidden alleyways, eating bazaar food and speaking Bengali with Pushpa, than dancing in glittering ballrooms with potential husbands. Then one day Maisy’s tutor falls ill and his son stands in. Poetic, handsome and ambitious for an independent India, Sunil Banerjee promises Maisy the world. So begins a love affair that will cast her future, for better and for worse.

when she was badWhen she was bad by Tammy Cohen

Colleague, co-worker, killer – you see the people you work with every day. But what can’t you see? Who secretly hates you? Who is tortured by their past? Who is capable of murder?

The infiltratorsThe Infiltrators by Matt Helm

Beautiful, intelligent, fresh out of prison – Madeleine Ellershaw is Matt Helm’s latest case. She may have been imprisoned as a spy, but Helm soon realizes that Madeleine’s story isn’t so simple. He’s got to figure out why she took the rap for her husband nine years ago, what secrets are hiding in her past, and, most difficult of all: keep her alive.

different classDifferent Class by Joanne Harris

After 34 years at St Oswald’s Grammar in North Yorkshire, Latin master Roy Straitley has seen all kinds of boys come and go. Each class has its clowns, its rebels, its underdogs, its ‘Brodie’ boys who, whilst of course he doesn’t have favourites, hold a special place in an old teacher’s heart. But every so often there’s a boy who doesn’t fit the mould. A troublemaker. A boy with hidden shadows inside. With insolvency and academic failure looming, a new broom has arrived at the venerable school, bringing PowerPoint, sharp suits and even sixth form girls to the dusty corridors. But while Straitley does his sardonic best to resist this march to the future, a shadow from his past is stirring. A boy who even 20 years on haunts his teacher’s dreams. A boy capable of bad things.

TenacityTenacity by J.S. Law

A sailor hangs himself on board a naval submarine. Although ruled a suicide Lieutenant Danielle Lewis, the Navy’s finest Special Branch investigator, knows the sailor’s wife was found brutally murdered only days before. Now Dan must enter the cramped confines of HMS Tenacity to interrogate the tight-knit, male crew and determine if there’s a link. Standing alone in the face of extreme hostility and with a possible killer on board, Dan soon realises that she may have to choose between the truth and her own survival. The pressure is rising and Dan’s time is running out!

HawkwoodHawkwood by Jack Ludlow

The Hundred Year’s War is over and newly-knighted Sir John Hawkswood is headed for France to make his fortune as a freebooter. Violence and extortion are rife, and the freebooters will stop at nothing to capture the Papal City of Avignon. But this is only the beginning: Italy beckons, and with it, yet more battles against rival mercenaries, powerful cities and the Papal State.

Pretty isPretty Is by Maggie Mitchell

Lois and Carly-May were just twelve when they were abducted by a stranger and imprisoned in a cabin in the woods for two months. That summer, under the watchful gaze of their kidnapper, they formed a bond that would never be broken. Decades later, both women have new lives and identities. But the events of that summer are about to come back with a vengeance. Lois and Carly-May must face the truth about their secret, shared past. What really happened in the woods that summer?

Himmlers CookHimmler’s Cook by Franz-Olivier Giesbert

Aged 105, Rose has endured more than her fair share of hardships – the Armenian genocide, the Nazi regime, and the delirium of Maoism. Yet somehow, despite all the suffering, Rose never loses her joie de vivre. Quirky and eccentric, ‘Himmler’s Cook’ is a hilarious picaresque tale of survival, as Giesbert depicts Rose’s unique life experiences – cook for Himmler, confidante to Hitler, and friend of Simone de Beauvoir. The novel tells the epic tale of an inspiring, resilient Marseillaise chef who embodies the sentiment of what doesn’t kill you only makes you stronger.

 

 

 

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New Fiction this week

The Easter break is upon us. What better time than to snuggle up with a hot drink, the odd easter egg or two and a good book?

song for a skylarkSong of the Skylark by Erica James

Lizzie has an unfortunate knack for attracting bad luck, but this time she’s hit the jackpot. Losing her heart to her boss at the radio station where she works leads directly to losing her job, and with no money in the bank she’s forced to swallow her pride and return home to her parents. As if that wasn’t bad enough, her mother finds her work at the local care home for the elderly, and it’s there that Lizzie meets Mrs Dallimore. In her nineties, Mrs Dallimore also finds herself in a situation which she’s reluctantly coming to terms with. Old age has finally caught up with her, and with her life drawing to a close she gives in to the temptation to relive the past by sharing it with Lizzie.

Time of deathTime of Death by Mark Billingham

Two schoolgirls are abducted in the small, dying Warwickshire town of Polesford, driving a knife into the heart of the community where police officer Helen Weeks grew up and from which she long ago escaped. But this is a place full of secrets, where dangerous truths lie buried. When it’s splashed all over the press that family man Stephen Bates has been arrested, Helen and her partner Tom Thorne head to the flooded town to support Bates’ wife – an old school friend of Helen’s – who is living under siege with two teenage children and convinced of her husband’s innocence. As residents and media bay for Bates’ blood, a decomposing body is found. The police believe they have their murderer in custody, but one man believes otherwise. With a girl still missing, Thorne sets himself on a collision course with local police, townsfolk – and a merciless killer.

The mistake i madeThe mistake I made by Paula Daly

We all think we know who we are. What we’re capable of. Roz is a single mother, a physiotherapist, a sister, a friend. She’s also desperate. Her business has gone under, she’s crippled by debt and she’s just had to explain to her son why someone’s taken all their furniture away. But now a stranger has made her an offer. For one night with her, he’ll pay enough to bring her back from the edge. Roz has a choice to make.

EleanorEleanor by Jason Gurley

‘Eleanor’ is the story of choices that ripple through time far beyond the moment they’re made. And what happens when, just sometimes, bonds are so powerful they reach beyond this world and into another.

The passengerThe Passenger by Lisa Lutz

Tanya DuBois doesn’t exist. At least not after an accident leaves her husband dead and thrusts her into the uncomfortably familiar position of Suspect No 1. She has only one choice: run. But as ‘Tanya’ watches her life recede in the rearview mirror, we realise she was never real to begin with. And neither is Amelia Keen, Debra Maze, Emma Lark, Sonia Lubovich, or a girl called only Jo. Or almost any of the things she tells us about herself, her past or where she is going next. She is ‘Amelia’ when she meets Blue, another woman with a life she’d rather not discuss, and thinks she’s found a kindred spirit. But as the body count rises around them their pasts and futures begin to clash.

One salt seaOne Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire

October ‘Toby’ Daye is finally doing all right. She’s settling into her new role as the Countess of Goldengreen; she’s actually dating again; she’s even agreed to take on Quentin as her official squire. Life is looking up all around – and that inevitably means it’s time for things to take a turn for the worse. Someone has kidnapped the sons of Duchess Dianda Lorden, regent of the Undersea Duchy of Saltmist. To prevent a war between land and sea, Toby must not only find the missing boys, but also prove that the Queen of the Mists was not behind their abduction. She’ll need all her tricks and the help of all her allies if she wants to make it through this in one piece.

The little runawaysThe Little Runaways by Cathy Sharp

Nancy and Terry have suffered terrible abuse at the hands of their father. Finding their way to St Saviour’s Children’s Home should mean safety. But little Terry is terribly damaged by his experiences, and the carers face challenges they could never have foreseen.

The house of hidden mothersThe house of hidden mothers by Meera Syal

Little India, East London: Shyama, aged 48, has fallen for a younger man. They want a child together. Meanwhile, in a rural village in India, young Mala, trapped in an oppressive marriage, dreams of escape. When Shyama and Mala meet, they help each other realise their dreams. But will fate guarantee them both happiness?

House of thievesHouse of Thieves by Charles Belfoure

In 1886 New York, a respectable architect shouldn’t have any connection to the notorious gang of thieves and killers that rules the underbelly of the city. But when John Cross’s son racks up an unfathomable gambling debt to Kent’s Gent’s, Cross must pay it back himself. All he has to do is use his inside knowledge of high society mansions and museums to craft a robbery even the smartest detectives can’t solve. The take better include some cash too – the bigger the payout, the faster this will be over. With a newfound talent for sniffing out vulnerable and lucrative targets, Cross becomes invaluable to the gang. But Cross’s entire life has become a balancing act, and it will only take one mistake for it all to come crashing down – and for his family to go down, too.

The food of loveThe food of love by Prue Leith

WWII is not yet over. Snubbed by aristocratic neighbour Lord Frampton at a coming-of-age ball, Donald Oliver dreams of the day he’ll have his vengeance. His wild daughter, Laura, beautiful and tempestuous, falls in love with Giovanni, an Italian ex-prisoner-of-war, now a humble cook. Disdaining her father’s snobbishness – and his wrath – the couple flees to London. But they arrive to a city that has not yet re-awoken after the traumas of war. Facing destitution, only their love for one another and their dream of opening a restaurant business keeps them going.

The dolocherThe Dolocher by Caroline Barry

The Dolocher is stalking the alleyways of Dublin. Half man, half pig, this terrifying creature has unleashed panic on the streets. Can it really be the evil spirit of a murderer who has cheated the hangman’s noose by taking his own life in his prison cell, depriving the mob of their rightful revenge? Or is there some other strange supernatural explanation? This terror has come at the perfect time for down-at-heel writer Solomon Fish. With his new broadsheet reporting ever more gruesome stories of the mysterious Dolocher, sales are growing daily and fuelling the city’s fear. But when the Dolocher starts killing and Solomon himself is set upon, he realises that there’s more to the story than he could ever have imagined.

 

 

 

 

 

Leeds Libraries – New Fiction this week

Start planning your summer reads. Lots of new fiction arrives in our branches every week. Here are a few of this weeks additions.

Go set a watchmanGo Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

Scout (Jean Louise Finch) has returned to Maycomb from New York to visit her father Atticus. She is forced to grapple with issues both personal and political as she tries to understand both her father’s attitude toward society and her own feelings about the place where she was born and spent her childhood

Glasgow Coma ScaleThe Glasgow Coma Scale by Neil Stewart

Lynne is a young woman who once dreamed of being an artist, but whose promotion to supervisor at an insurance call centre in Glasgow is sucking the soul out of her. When she hands a fiver to a homeless man on the street in town one day, she is shocked to recognise Angus – her former art teacher on whom she once had a crush. What on earth could have reduced him to life on the street? In a gesture of uncharacteristic rashness, she invites him home, and so begins ‘The Glasgow Coma Scale’

Nothing but trouble

Nothing But Trouble by Matt Cain 

Lola Grant is the hottest pop star in Britain and she’s about to go global. But behind the music, her addiction to bad boys is taking her personal life in a dangerous direction. When it comes to men, Lola just can’t stay away from trouble – and her self-control is pushed to the limit when she meets her handsome new drummer Jake Hunter. Looking out for Lola is her best friend and manager Harvey Sparks. But Harvey’s fighting his own demons and can only watch from the sidelines as the star he helped create begins to fall. When Lola seeks comfort in a life of wild partying, she meets good-hearted showbiz reporter Freddy Jones, a man who may just be able to offer her a way out. But as she starts rehearsals for her Trouble tour, Lola finds herself faced with a new threat, one much bigger than anything she’s ever experienced.

The Mixture as BeforeThe Mixture as Before by Rosie Harris

Newly widowed after a forty-year marriage, Margaret Wright is finding it hard to adjust to independence, having been stifled for so long by her overbearing, controlling husband. Is she up to the challenge?

The last embraceThe Last Embrace by Pam Jenoff

August 1940 and 16-year-old refugee Addie escapes Fascist Italy to live with her aunt and uncle in Atlantic City. As WW2 breaks, she finds acceptance and love with Charlie Connally and his family. But war changes everything: secrets and passions abound, and when one brother’s destructive choices lead to the tragic death of another, the Connally family is decimated, and Addie along with them. Now 18, she flees, first to Washington and then to war-torn London where she is swept up with life as a correspondent. But when Charlie, now a paratrooper, re-appears, Addie discovers that the past is impossible to outrun. Now she must make one last desperate attempt to find within herself the answers that will lead the way home.

Three moments of an explosionThree Moments of an Explosion: Stories by China Mieville

In these stories, glistening icebergs float above urban horizons; a burning stag runs wild through the city; the ruins of industry emerge unsteadily from the sea; and the abandoned generations in a decayed space-elevator look not up at the stars but down at the Earth. Ranging from portraits of childhood to chilling ghost stories, from dystopian visions to poignant evocations of uncanny love, with beautiful prose and melancholy wit, this collection poses searching questions of what it is to be human in an unquiet world.

Foxglove SummerFoxglove Summer by Ben Aaronovitch

Ben Aaronovitch takes Peter Grant out of whatever comfort zone he might have found and takes him out of London – to a small village in Herefordshire where the local police are reluctant to admit that there might be a supernatural element to the disappearance of some local children. But while you can take the London copper out of London you can’t take the London out of the copper. Travelling west with Beverley Brook, Peter soon finds himself caught up in a deep mystery and having to tackle local cops and local gods.

The Baklava ClubThe Baklava Club by Jason Goodwin     

In 19th-century Istanbul, a Polish prince has been kidnapped. His assassination has been bungled and his captors have taken him to an unused farmhouse. Little do they realise that their revolutionary cell has been penetrated by their enemies, who use the code name La Piuma (the Feather). Yashim is convinced that the prince is alive. But he has no idea where, or who La Piuma is – and has become dangerously distracted by falling in love. As he draws closer to the prince’s whereabouts and to the true identity of La Piuma, Yashim finds himself in the most treacherous situation of his career: can he rescue the prince along with his romantic dreams?

Follow the links on the book titles to find the books in our catalogue.

Fiction this week – lots of blockbusters

 

The Museum of Extraordinary ThingsThe new fiction this week includes lots of paperback copies of blockbusters

‘Silken Bonds’, ‘Love Match’ and ‘The First Rebellion’ by M. C. Beaton, ‘The Bootlegger’ by Clive Cussler and ‘By its Cover’ by Donna Leon, to name but a few.

Thriller lovers there’s loads of copies of ‘Wolf’ by Mo Hader, or try ‘The Dead in the Vaulted Arches’ by  C Alan Bradley or ‘The Skeleton Road’ by Val McDermid. – When a skeleton is discovered hidden at the top of a gothic Victorian building in Edinburgh, cold case squad detective Karen Pirie is given the task of identifying the decades-old bones. However, her investigation leads her back to past conflicts, false identities and buried secrets

Something coming through‘Something coming through’ is scifi by Paul J McAuley The Jackaroo have given humanity 15 worlds and the means to reach them. They’re a chance to start over, but they’re also littered with ruins and artifacts left by the Jackaroo’s previous clients.

‘The Museum of Extraordinary Things’ by Alice Hoffman, Alice is set in New York City, 1911. Meet Coralie Sardie, circus girl, web-fingered mermaid, shy only daughter of Professor Sardie and raised in the bizarre surroundings of his Museum of Extraordinary Things. And meet Eddie Cohen, a handsome young immigrant who has run away from his painful past and his Orthodox family to become a photographer, documenting life on the teeming city streets. One night by the freezing waters of the Hudson River, Coralie stumbles across Eddie, who has become enmeshed in the case of a missing girl, and the fates of these two hopeful outcasts collide as they search for truth, beauty, love and freedom in tumultuous times.

Just want a relaxing read – ‘A lesson in love’ by Gervaise Phinn fits the bill

Hausfrau, desperately seeking – a review

HausfrauHausfrau is a novel coming to libraries very soon and it’s the first by the author Jill Alexander Essbaum, an acclaimed American poet

It’s been tipped for success and has also been likened to Madame Bovary or Anna Karenina meets Fifty Shades – make of that what you will!

“It’s an absolute fact: Swiss trains run on time,” it says at the start of the story. The hausfrau of the title is Anna, an expat American, who seems to be a passenger on the train and in life too.

Her life in the suburbs of Zurich with husband Bruno and their two sons is boring and echoes an earlier era as she doesn’t drive, earn a living or even have her own bank account.

Not everything is quite as it seems, because “Some women collected spoons. Anna  collected lovers.” Although she is “a good wife, mostly”, she begins an affair with another student in her German class, leaving her kids with their grandmother.  Her affairs (it’s not her first) are carried on with detachment and men are picked up at various places.

Then something bad happens and her already fragmented existence falls apart. Anna can’t create a meaningful life and it’s her faults and mistakes that involve us with the character.

A gripping story about someone coming to self knowledge and worth a read.

The Fiction Hotlist is out. Inspire yourself with these new titles

The kindness545 copies of new fiction are on their way to libraries this week! Take a look at the list.

Feeling summery and want a light read?  Jenny Colgan – ‘Summer at Little Beach Street Bakery’ and ‘A Summer Promise’ by Sunday Times bestselling author, Katie Flynn, might fit the bill, as might ‘Wild Wood’ by Posie Graeme-Evans about a young archaeologist who unearths ancient secrets, a tragic romance, and Viking treasure on a remote Scottish island.

‘The Testament’ is a new thriller by Eric Lustbader, author of the Jason Bourne series .

Dr Who fans ‘Time Trips’ is a collection of short stories featuring Doctor Who, authors Summer at Little Beach Street Bakeryinclude Jake Arnott, Cecelia Ahern and Joanne Harris. Scifi/fantasy fans – how about ‘A Darker Shade of Magic’ by Victoria Schwab.

Ashes in the Wind’ is a well- reviewed saga by Christopher Bland, rooted in his own Anglo-Irish family’s history, it brings to vivid life the people and places of 20thC Ireland in a story of love, violence and redemption. ‘

The Kindness’ by Polly Samson sounds The buried giantgood – ‘Julian’s fall begins the moment he sets eyes on Julia. Julia is married and eight years his senior; he is a gifted English student, a life of academia ahead. Ignoring warnings from family and friends they each give up all they have to be together.’

For a bit of humour – ‘Style’ – Joseph Connolly’s comedy of manners

As a fan, I will get my name down for ‘The Buried Giant’ by Kazuo Ishiguro about a couple who set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen in years. ‘Sometimes savage, often intensely moving, Kazuo Ishiguro’s first novel in a decade is about lost memories, love, revenge and war.’

The Fiction Hotlist for March 4

The silent boyWhat’s in the new fiction this week? Don’t miss well established authors like James Patterson and Jeffery Archer but do take a look at the full list for your favourites, we recommend –

Bestseller ‘The Dandelion Years’ by Erica James – a story of wartime love or for something a bit harder edged, try ‘Too Close to Home’ by Susan Lewis, another Sunday Times bestseller about a family making a fresh start in Wales but it unravelling into a nightmare. ‘The Girl in the Red Coat’ by Kate Hamer has been acclaimed – again it’s the story of a child’s disappearance.

The girl in the red coatStill for crime fans there’s ‘Terminal City’ by Linda Fairstein, New York Times bestselling author who delivers another breakneck thriller that captures the essence of New York City – its glamour, possibilities and  endless capacity for darkness  and Veronica Heley’s ‘Murder in Time’ about complicated relationships –it’s the fifteenth dark and sinister  Ellie Quicke mystery.

If you like some history dished up with your murder mystery try C J Samsom-ish ‘The Invention of Fire’ by Bruce Holsinger set in London, 1386. Young King Richard II faces the double threat of a French invasion and growing unrest amongst his barons – and now there’s evil afoot in the City. Sixteen corpses have been discovered in a sewer….. Stay up with me

Historical crime novel of the year ‘The Silent Boy’ by Andrew Taylor is out in paperback. Paris, 1792.  A mute boy has witnessed horrors beyond his years, but what terrible secret haunts him so deeply that he is unable to utter a word?

‘Winter Pilgrims’ by Toby Clements is set in February, 1460 –  a young nun is caught outside her priory walls by a corrupt knight, rescued by a young monk with far reaching consequences.

Or enjoy these more darkly humourous stories of confounded expectations in ‘Stay Up with Me’ by Tom Barbash